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FERIDE YALAV-HECKEROTH RECOMMENDS: PHILOLOGICAL LIBRARY

FERIDE YALAV-HECKEROTH RECOMMENDS: PHILOLOGICAL LIBRARY

Rising like an extraterrestrial sphere from the usual gridline construction of a university campus, the Philological Library of the Free University of Berlin is an entity of welcomed visual deviance. Completed in 2005 by Foster + Partners (an architecture firm founded by Lord Norman Foster) the library is another addition to a portfolio known for its proclivity for the high tech (they are also the firm behind the otherworldly Reichstag dome). Open to the public, the only thing mandatory is the placement of all possessions in one of the lockers locked, befittingly, electronically. From the top floor of the core structure, the bright yellow entrance and the undulating curve of each floor below is an astounding sight for a building that houses books about the, mesmerizing in its own right, history of language. Said to be one of the firm’s most ecologically advanced projects, decades of research and experimentation were conducted to maximize energy efficiency while equally minimizing the environmental impact. Endearingly referred to as the “Berlin Brain” due to its form being reminiscent of a cranium, the library is awash in natural light and the unmistakable silence of students in a daze of academic concentration. (Text: Feride Yalav-Heckeroth / Photos: Bernd Wannenmacher, David Ausserhofer, Reinhard Gorner)

Philological Library — Free University of Berlin, Habelschwerdter Allee 45, 14195 Berlin-Dahlem; map

Mon-Fri 9-22, Sat-Sun 10-20h

Feride Yalav-Heckeroth is a freelance writer who has written for Brownbook, The Carton, and The Guide Istanbul. She’s been living in Kreuzberg for six months and is working as a freelance writer for Gestalten.

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VLADIMIR KARALEEV RECOMMENDS: TEEHAUS IM ENGLISCHEN GARTEN

VLADIMIR KARALEEV RECOMMENDS: TEEHAUS IM ENGLISCHEN GARTEN

Teehaus im Englischen Garten is featured in our Cee Cee No.2 Book, which is available for purchase here.

In the middle of the Englischen Garten, which is located on the northwestern edge of the Tiergarten, sits a tea house. The location itself indicates that this is a secret place waiting to be discovered. As the name already implies, it offers a fine selection of teas, which you might miss sometimes in a coffee-centered city like Berlin nowadays. As with many other Berlin landmarks, there’s also history alive in the Teehaus: since May 1952 the guest house and the garden have been open to the public, thanks to the initiative of the Commandant of the British occupation zone. Like so much else in Berlin, Tiergarten did not escape the effects of the war — only 700 of the 200,000 trees that covered the park survived. As a gesture of friendship, the British donated more than 5,000 trees. Built on the foundations of the actor Gustaf Gründgens’ home, the Teehaus offers exactly what you’d expect from a day trip in Berlin: a mixture of tradition and curiosity. (Text: Vladimir Karaleev / Photos: Daniel Farò)

Teehaus im Englischen Garten, Altonaer Str.2, 10557 Berlin-Tiergarten; map
Tue-Sat 12-24h, Sun 10-24h

From Friedrichshain to Schöneberg, Bulgarian fashion designer Vladimir Karaleev has lived in most corners of this city. He’s been drawn to the busy streets of Berlin since 2001 – and founded his eponymous fashion label in 2010.

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VANESSA BUJAK RECOMMENDS: LULA AM MARKT

VANESSA BUJAK RECOMMENDS: LULA AM MARKT

I love Scandinavia. Maybe that’s why I keep coming back to LuLa am Markt in Friedenau. Although its menu can’t be attributed specifically to Denmark or Sweden — or any other specific nationality, really — everything about the place reminds me of Scandinavia. Maybe it’s the smell of cinnamon rolls. Or the simple but cozy and bright decor. In the morning, there’s delicious breakfast to suit all tastes, from golden porridge to avocado bagels. For lunch and dinner, there’s pizza and salad, but also small plates like the hummus. LuLa’s house-baked cakes are not only delicious, but are also served in generous portions. Speaking of homemade, almost everything is produced on-site: from plentiful variations on sourdough and sweet preserves to pickled vegetables. “Think global, act local” is the mantra that owners Sarah and Robert Sever follow in everything they do — like listing their suppliers on their website. It’s hard to get more hyperlocal than their fruit and vegetables, which are delivered three times weekly from the Breslauer Platz Wochenmarkt the café looks out over. Market days, by the way, are my favourite time to visit LuLa. Depending on the weather, you can stretch out in the sunshine with a homemade lemonade on the terrace, or sip on a hot tea, all wrapped up in a blanket, and watch the hustle and bustle of market day action play out in the square. If it weren’t for the “Berliner Schnauze” of the stallholders, you might just feel like you were in hygge-filled Nørrebro… (Text: Vanessa Bujak / Photos: LuLa am Markt)

LuLa am Markt, Lauterstr.14, 12159 Berlin-Friedenau, map
Mon-Fri 8.30-24h, Sat-Sun 9-24h

Vanessa Bujak is Marketing Manager at Berlin bag label Loqi. Since 2014, she’s had a permanent base in Berlin, in Rome, Bologna and Düsseldorf. Friedenau is now the neighbourhood she fondly calls home.

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CHRISTIAN METZNER RECOMMENDS: WOLTERSDORF TRAM

CHRISTIAN METZNER RECOMMENDS: WOLTERSDORF TRAM

This guest contribution is featured in our Cee Cee No.2 Book, which is available for purchase here.

The sign of the Rahnsdorf train station stands just a few steps outside the forest. The tiny, rickety, ’60s-era street tram is there already, having been waiting for some time. The driver has already made his round: “Morning all, anyone without a ticket?” Two wooden doors close with a loud thunk. A jerk forward, and the train begins to rattle its way to Woltersdorf. The ride passes through a light-dappled forest, onto the Schleuse and then — the Flakensee. At the end awaits a handful of quaint cafes, two gorgeous lakes, a small observation tower, and a paddle boat rental shop. The tram seems like a piece of a bygone era, forever on an endless path between Berlin and Brandenburg and back. Like clockwork, it makes its journey over and over, always offering an empty space to those who long for nearby distant lands. (Text: Christian Metzner / Photos: Daniel Farò)

Woldersdorfer S-Bahn, between Rahnsdorf Bahnhof and Woltersdorfer Schleuse; map

Mon-Fri 4.37-24.18, Sat & Sun 5.43-24.18

Whether purses or porcelain, product designer and Brandenburg native Christian Metzner‘s perfectly proportioned creations appear almost ethereal. However, he’s in fact quite down-to-earth, and grounds himself by taking his quaint boat out on the water from his home base in Potsdam.

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PETER DURAN RECOMENDS: SHIO

PETER DURAN RECOMENDS: SHIO

Shio is a small clothing shop that has been flying under the Neukölln radar for about six years now, providing a welcome contrast to the local topography. The shop’s owner, Kate Pinkstone, has run the place by herself since the beginning, which shows in the considered, warm details to be found throughout. Kate’s approach initially spoke to me because of her heavy use of upcycling — where she takes clothes found at flea markets, alters them in ways that are almost alien to their original form, and gives them new life by combining them with unique fabrics. The results are fresh pieces with a timeless quality and simple silhouettes that allow the fabrics to speak for themselves. I became such a big fan of her approach, and am sure that at least half of my shirts are from Shio. Since 2012, the shop has grown to include a studio space and workshop housing four local designers and makers. (Text: Peter Duran / Photos: Kate Pinkstone)

Shio, Weichselstr. 59, 12045 Berlin-Neukölln; map
Mon-Sat 12-19h

Peter Duran is the co-owner and operator of Isla Coffee Berlin and hails from near Detroit (Michigan). Peter has lived in Berlin since 2014.

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