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Cee Cee is a Newsletter

Cee Cee is a weekly email magazine with hand-selected recommendations for Berlin and beyond. Every now and then you’ll find paid posts as part of the newsletter, marked as “Sponsored Posts”. Subscribe here to receive Cee Cee every Thursday and follow us on Facebook and Instagram for more tips!

SIRONI: DELIGHTFULLY-BAKED PIZZA FROM PRO BAKERS — NOW TO GO

SIRONI: DELIGHTFULLY-BAKED PIZZA FROM PRO BAKERS — NOW TO GO

Editor’s note: Sironi La Pizza will be open for dining again soon – until then you can order their pizza and ice cream for pickup or delivery. The bakery next door is open for the fundamentals too!

Alfredo Sironi has influenced the Berlin bread scene like few others, so we’ll forgive the long wait for him to open his first pizzeria, Sironi la Pizza. The place itself reminds you of an airy reception hall and is brought to life by the warmth of the service. To start, you’ll find a basket of famous Sironi sourdough bread on your table before you get stuck into the starters: a creamy burrata with anchovies and thin chickpea dough pancakes. As for the pizzas, the different varieties come either on a traditional wheat base or a spelt flour version. Toppings aren’t customizable, but you won’t mind: the Wheat Calzone comes with a delightfully bready base and lighter toppings while the Passatello with matured Parmigiano, lemon, mushrooms and rocket makes for a real treat. These are not your classic Neapolitan pizzas, but that’s what makes them excitingly different. To finish, don’t miss out on the homemade pistachio and hazelnut ice cream (currently available to take away) and whilst you’re here try the new Sironi bakery right next door. (Text: Eva Biringer / Photos: Savannah van der Niet)

Sironi la Pizza, Goltzstr.36, 10781 Berlin–Schöneberg; map
Regular: Wed–Fri 17–0h, Sat–Sun 12–0h
Currently open for collection and delivery daily from 16–21h to the following postcodes: 10781, 10777, 10779, 10827, 10823. Minimum order €25. No delivery fee.
@sironi_lapizza
@sironibakery

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ONLINE RADIO FOR A BREAK FROM YOUR PLAYLISTS — CEE CEE FAVORITE GDS.FM

ONLINE RADIO FOR A BREAK FROM YOUR PLAYLISTS — CEE CEE FAVORITE GDS.FM

Even music is a private affair these days as people sit at home and stream their own playlists. But if Spotify suggestions are starting to sound too uninspiring, then online radio station GDS.FM is the perfect antidote. The channel started streaming 24 hours a day from the living room of founder Christian Gamp in 2014, before moving to a dedicated broadcasting bar in 2017. The music itself is genre-busting, defying all categorization: expect everything from rave to hip hop to indie to folk and more. The one thing that holds it together is a desire to go against the grain: the tracklists are put together by real people, a world away from AI, user analysis and click rates. The all-day lineup includes playlists, DJ sets and live concerts, and chat is kept to a minimum – it’s all about good music. At the Cee Cee office the station has been a firm favorite for years, with an unobtrusive sound that never approaches muzak. If you want to break the silence without disturbing the peace, GDS is right on your wavelength. (Text: Sven Hausherr / Photos: Jasmin Frei, GDS Radio & Mathyas Kurmann)

GDS.FM
@gdsfm

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GREENCADEMY STARTER KITS FOR LITTLE GARDENERS — RECOMMENDED BY SONIA LAGO

GREENCADEMY STARTER KITS FOR LITTLE GARDENERS — RECOMMENDED BY SONIA LAGO

Last week I was given a Greencademy grow box for my son. These kits, developed by sisters Jelena and Zeljana, let children grow their own vegetables and learn about nature in a playful and easy way. My four-year-old is now planting his first vegetable garden, doing all stages himself: adding water to the soil tablets in the provided coconut-fiber pots, sewing the organic radish and lettuce seeds into the soil before learning to be a bit patient! When, after five days, seeds finally sprouted from the earth, he was delighted. In the evening before going to bed, he reminds me how important it is to water his plants tomorrow, and continues to regularly check his garden, always amazed at how the greens grow bigger every day. Together we are looking forward to tasting our own vegetables from the small harvest – in three weeks according to the easy-to-follow instructions. These small boxes of greenery can currently be ordered directly from the Greencademy online shop. (Text: Sonia Lago / Photos: Rei Matsuoka)

Sonia Lago is Swiss with Spanish roots, and lives with her husband and child in Prenzlauer Berg. She is a self-employed Strategist.

Greencademy kits are available online.
@greencademy

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VIEW VIDEO ART IN YOUR LIVING ROOM — JSC MEDIA LIBRARY

VIEW VIDEO ART IN YOUR LIVING ROOM — JSC MEDIA LIBRARY

How can we experience art at home now that our beloved cultural institutions are closed? Well thanks to the online library from the Julia Stoschek Collection – Berlin’s first port of call for video art – you don’t have to go without. On show are tours, documentaries and discussions of past exhibitions, such as the short film about cinematographer Arthur Jafa’s exhibition “A Series of Utterly Improbable, Yet Extraordinary Renditions“, vividly summarizing his themes of identity and racism. The companion artist talk with UdK art historian Jörg Heiser is worth watching too. Also showing is the 2012 performance from Johannes Paul Raether and Ute Waldhausen exploring the connections between capitalism and the future of humanity through different fictional characters. Lined up too is Berlin-based artist A.K. Burns, who talks about her four-part series Negative Space, which was created over seven years and investigates the empty visual space beyond the subject of a picture. This media library now offers the opportunity to view the works in an isolated, cinematic way – with an almost meditative result. (Text: Hanna Komornitzyk / Photos: ‘Living Room’ (2017) by A.K. Burns, ‘A Smeary Spot’ (2015) by A.K. Burns & JSC On view: Lutz Bacher, Barbara Hammer, Carolee Schneemann)

Julia Stoschek Collection: Media Center
@juliastoschekcollection

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A RECIPE FROM @JUDILICIOUSANDNUTRITIOUS: KIMCHI, PEANUT BUTTER AND MISO ON BUCKWHEAT PANCAKES

A RECIPE FROM @JUDILICIOUSANDNUTRITIOUS: KIMCHI, PEANUT BUTTER AND MISO ON BUCKWHEAT PANCAKES

Judith Gilles (Judilicious and Nutritious) is a chef, blogger, recipe developer, food photographer and peanut butter fiend. She’s been cooking since her teen years, launching her blog in 2018. From nutty loaves with cashew butter to warm porridge rippled with maple syrup, Judith has home comfort food mastered, and regularly shares recipes on her blog, with a plant-based, wholesome focus. As a chef it was natural Judith started experimenting with fermenting. She recently ran her first fermenting workshop, with Onur Malay (who had just completed an internship at Mimi Ferments) assisting. We were lucky to take part and learn about fermenting techniques and ingredients (Did you know cocoa beans and olives are fermented?) and came home with the kimchi we’d made. Judith’s workshops complete with vegan brunching and colorful dining will return later this year. In the meantime, we asked her to share a recipe (see below) with us inspired by the workshop: kimchi, peanut butter & miso on buckwheat pancakes. (Text: Scarlett Peeters / Photos: Savannah van der Niet & Judith Gilles)

Details of the next workshop will be announced on Judith’s Instagram and Blog.
@judiliciousandnutritious

Kimchi, Peanut Butter & Miso on Buckwheat Pancakes

Recipe by Judith Gilles

May sound odd but it’s a real game changer!

For the vegan Kimchi you will need:

1 head Chinese cabbage 

1 tbsp sea salt

2 medium sized carrots, finely sliced or grated 

4 spring onions, roughly chopped 

For the Kimchi marinade :

2 tbsp tamari (you can also substitute with soy sauce)

2 tbsp date syrup

1/4 cup apple juice

1 apple 

1 white onion 

1 thumb-pieced chunk of ginger

2 cloves of garlic

2 tsp salt

1/2 cup Gochugaru (these are Korean Chili flakes – if you want use regular chili flakes, be aware that it may be spicier and not taste like traditional kimchi, but still delicious!)

1/4 cup lukewarm water

What you will also need: 

Mason jar, clean and rinsed with hot water before use. 

Make sure that you wash your hands before being in contact with the ingredients. Despite basic hygienic measures, we all have naturally occurring bacteria on our hands some of which may even aid the fermentation process – so don’t be afraid, your kitchen doesn’t have to turn into a sanitised hospital room! 

Instructions: 

1. Remove the outer leaves of the cabbage and rinse them well. We need them to seal our jar of kimchi later on! 

2. Take the rest of your cabbage and slice it into bite-friendly chunks (we do not need it finely grated as we would with Sauerkraut!). 

3. Place your cabbage chunks in a big bowl and generously sprinkle with salt – 1 tablespoon of salt per cabbage will be enough. Place a weight (such as a pot or a plate) on your salted cabbage and let it rest for at least 1 hour (2 hours are better – if you have enough time, you can even let the cabbage rest overnight). 

4. In the meantime, prepare the marinade. Place all ingredients in a blender and mix until well combined. 

5. Rinse the cabbage to remove the salt, then let it rest in a strainer to allow excess water to drain. 

6. Transfer the cabbage back to the big bowl and add in the carrots, spring onions and your kimchi marinade. Mix well, then press into your mason jar so that it submerges in its own juice. If you find that there isn’t sufficient liquid to ensure that our kimchi is covered in liquid, add a few tbsp of salted water (2% salt solution). To create a natural seal and prevent oxygen from spoiling our beloved kimchi, stuff one of the outer cabbage leaves that we saved earlier on top of your kimchi. Another trick is to add a weight to your jar – such as a small plastic bag filled with water and tied with a knot so no liquid can escape. Simply add this weight onto the mason jar and gently press it down, thereby making sure that liquid shoots up the sides to keep our cabbage under wraps. 

6. Remove the rubber band of your mason jar and close the lid. The gases formed throughout the fermentation process will now be able to escape the jar. Let the kimchi ferment for a minimum of 2-3 days at room temperature, then place in the fridge. If you’re in for a funkier, tangier and more intense flavour profile, let it ferment for longer! I let mine bubble for a week and loved the result. Once in the fridge, your kimchi will be good for a few months. 

For the peanut butter & miso spread 

3 tbsp peanut butter (I use unsweetened, slightly chunky peanut butter) 

1 tbsp miso of choice (you can use red or white miso) 

1 dash of toasted sesame oil, if you have it 

1 tsp maple syrup, date syrup or honey 

A few tbsp of water 

Instructions: 

1. Combine all ingredients in a bowl and add one tablespoon of water at a time. Stir until you get a smooth, creamy, spreadable consistency. 

For the buckwheat pancakes 

100g buckwheat flour 

100g spelt flour 

2 tsp baking soda

2 tbsp apple cider vinegar 

1 tbsp olive oil 

300 ml water 

salt to taste 

Instructions: 

1. Mix the dry ingredients, then add the wet ones. Stir until the dough comes together. Add a little oil to the pan and then fry the pancakes for 2-3 mins on each side. 

2. Now let’s make this magic happen. Take a buckwheat pancake (or if you skipped that step, you can also use a slice of bread – I highly recommend toasted sourdough), generously spread some of the peanut butter & miso paste onto it and top it up with your fermented homemade kimchi. Bite into it and tell me that this isn’t incredibly delicious – I wouldn’t believe you!

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