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ADVENTURES AMIDST PALACES, CATHEDRALS AND THE MUSEUM ISLAND LUSTGARTEN — AN AUDIOWALK FROM RAUM+ZEIT

ADVENTURES AMIDST PALACES, CATHEDRALS AND THE MUSEUM ISLAND LUSTGARTEN — AN AUDIOWALK FROM RAUM+ZEIT

With the cold season approaching, it’s the perfect time for long walks in the golden light and evenings spent at the theater. If that sounds like your thing, then you’ll want to experience the audio walk from Raum+Zeit, which offers both at the same time. The Berlin collective’s theatrical productions have always brought audiences to unusual spaces, and for its latest piece – entitled Rendezvous – the setting is one of the most visited parts of Berlin: Museum Island. The work is the third in a series of performances that were created during the pandemic and which seek to reimagine the theater experience. This aim is reflected in the audio walk’s material, which was inspired by Terry Gilliam’s 90s sci-fi classic 12 Monkeys. You join fellow participants in a hunt for Patient Zero so you can prevent the impending outbreak of a virus. Beginning the 40 minute walk in pairs, you split from your companions before reuniting again later, with actress Bibiana Beglau given the role of your futuristic guide. It’s an exciting journey that shows the Berliner Dom, the Lustgarten and Museum Island in a new light. You can register for the walk with a partner or choose to go it alone. Who knows who you’ll meet?

Text: Hanna Komornitzyk / Photos: Valerie Groth

The Rendezvous audio walk (in German) is produced by Raum+Zeit. Information on times, tickets and meeting points can be found on the website. From 25.10.2021 the audio walk will be available online.

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CONFRONTING THE PAST WITH DANCE — JOIN PERFORMERS FOR CRITICAL JOURNEYS THROUGH THE HUMBOLDT FORUM

CONFRONTING THE PAST WITH DANCE — JOIN PERFORMERS FOR CRITICAL JOURNEYS THROUGH THE HUMBOLDT FORUM

With its sandstone blocks and towering columns, the Humboldt Forum seems solid and static. But head to Berlin’s newest super-museum this Saturday (09.10.2021) and you’ll find it buzzing with movement. The reason is Moving the Forum, a series of interactive performances taking place in and around the building over the coming year. This day of dance – named Approaching – is the first of four movement-based interventions where your active participation is encouraged. You join the artists as they walk, run and snake their way through the Forum, offering critical commentary as they go. For the “Listening Bodies” audio walk, you accompany three performers for an hour-long journey of sound that deals with the site’s controversial history – including the demolition of the GDR-era Palast der Republik that its construction necessitated. “This is not a Game”, meanwhile, sees 32 students from the Robert Blum Gymnasium team up with four artists to express how they – as children of the 21st century – relate to this resurrected Prussian palace. The critical gaze is even more intense with “Restless Objects”, where you watch three performers removing contentious ancient artifacts that were taken from foreign lands and now find themselves on show. The suggestion of the artists is clear: the Humboldt Forum and its collections are not quite as immovable as all the concrete and stone suggests… 

Text: Benji Haughton / Credit: Stiftung Humboldt Forum im Berliner Schloss / Photos: David von Becker

Humboldt Forum, Schloßplatz, 10178 Berlin–Mitte; map

Approaching, 09.10.2021 16–21h – part of the Moving the Forum series of dance events. Admission is free of charge.

@humboldtforum

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THE SUN MACHINE IS COMING DOWN — BERLINER FESTSPIELE AT THE ICC CONFERENCE CENTER

THE SUN MACHINE IS COMING DOWN — BERLINER FESTSPIELE AT THE ICC CONFERENCE CENTER

You might want to take the next ten days off work: today (07.10.2021) is the launch of The Sun Machine Is Coming Down, one of the most exciting art projects of the season. For its 70th anniversary, the Berliner Festspiele is bringing the Internationales Congress Centrum Berlin (ICC) to life with performance, dance, music and film. A ticket gives you three and a half hours to roam around the conference halls and appreciate the iconic 1970s design by Berlin architects Ralf Schüler and Ursulina Schüler-Witte. With an ambitious program, the exhibitions more than live up to the ICC’s spaceship-like exterior: there are things to see throughout the foyers and halls, opening up new dimensions in the space. You can spot works by artists like Monira Al Qadiri, Cyprien Gaillard and Tino Sehgal all over the building, as well as official performances but also spontaneous happenings. Completing the program are screenings from the Julia Stoschek Collection plus music curated by Martin Hossbach that uncovers connections between sound and architecture. Three and a half hours will probably not be enough to immerse yourself in all this, so why not go twice? Between Tuesday and Saturday, the halls are open until midnight!

Text: Laura Storfner / Photos: Credit: Andreas Gehrke; Nuno Cera; Laura Falafel

Internationales Congress Centrum Berlin (ICC), Messedamm 22, 14057 Berlin–Westend; map

The Sun Machine Is Coming Down, 07–17.10.2021, Tue–Fri 16–0h, Sat 14–0h, Sun 14–23h

The program and timetable can be found here. Tickets can be bought online for €23 or €15 for concessions. A ticket gives you access for 3h30.

@berlinerfestspiele

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ANOHA: THE CHILDREN’S SPACE AT THE JEWISH MUSEUM — RECOMMENDED BY MARIANNA HILLMER

ANOHA: THE CHILDREN’S SPACE AT THE JEWISH MUSEUM — RECOMMENDED BY MARIANNA HILLMER

Anoha is probably the coolest children’s exhibition in Berlin and dispels any old-fashioned notions you might have about museums. Serving as the youngster’s wing of the Jewish Museum, the space opened in summer 2021 and is a great place for kindergarten and elementary school children to explore, play, run and discover. The focus of the exhibition is the biblical story of Noah’s ark, the huge boat used by Noah to save all the animals from the great flood. The space is home to animals big and small – polar bears, camels, a giraffe whose neck is a slide – as well as rain effects and of course the ark itself. Children are invited to accompany the animal passengers and look after them during the journey before everyone disembarks the vessel together. Through play, children are encouraged to respect the coexistence of humans, animals and nature. The presence of extinct and endangered species like the giant sloth and orangutan draws attention to environmental problems and our role in causing and overcoming them. This playful place is the result of an innovative collaboration: the US firm Olson Kundig was responsible for conceiving the museum, with a special children’s council involved in its future development.

Text: Marianna Hillmer / Photos: Yves Sucksdorff

Hamburg-born Marianna Hillmer is co-founder of the independent travel book publisher Reisedepeschen. She lives with her family in Schöneberg.

Anoha – The Children’s World of the Jewish Museum Berlin
Fromet–und–Moses–Mendelssohn–Platz, 10969 Berlin–Kreuzberg; map
Tue–Fri 9–13h, Sat–Sun 10h30–16h 

@anohaberlin

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THE COOL AND THE COLD — GROPIUS BAU OPENS ITS DOORS FOR A COLD WAR ART EXHIBITION FROM THE LUDWIG FOUNDATION COLLECTION

THE COOL AND THE COLD — GROPIUS BAU OPENS ITS DOORS FOR A COLD WAR ART EXHIBITION FROM THE LUDWIG FOUNDATION COLLECTION

The biggest art collection you’ve ever seen spans 10,000km but fits into the ground floor of Gropius Bau in Mitte. Confused? We’ll explain: from now until 09.01.2022, six international museums are offering up works from the world’s most iconic artists for a one-of-a-kind exhibition in partnership with the Ludwig Foundation collection. As its title suggests, the collection of art in The Cool and the Cold: Painting in the USA and the USSR 1960–1990 spans three decades of the Cold War and the entire ground floor of Gropius Bau. Rather than curating retrospectively as is typical of historical shows like this, Peter and Irene Ludwig’s collection was actually acquired during the period of time it explores. This enriches the teachings and stories you experience throughout the exhibition.

This Cold War era saw forms of artistic expression develop that dealt with attitudes about politics, social reform, nuclear war and other fears. One question arises continually: are there differences between the ways USA and USSR paintings expressed these feelings and, if so, how are these contrasts presented? Jackson Pollock, Andy Warhol, Natalia Nesterova and Erik Bulatov plus 76 other names feature in the show, which extends to 120 paintings. Crucially, you can understand the artworks within the cultural context of this feverish era. The venue itself, which sits on the site the Berlin Wall and overlooks government buildings and the Topography of Terror, reminds us of the importance of artistic expression during the era and allows us to appreciate contemporary privileges and struggles.

Text: Rosie Gilmour / Credit: Estate of Roy Lichtenstein, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2020; Kunstmuseum Basel, Leihgabe der Peter und Irene Ludwig Stiftung; Ralph Goings; Ludwig Forum für Internationale Kunst Aachen / Photos: Kunstmuseum Basel, Martin P. Bühler; mumok – Museum moderner Kunst Stiftung Ludwig Wien,& Carl Brunn, Ludwig Forum für Internationale Kunst Aachen

Gropius Bau, Niederkirchnerstr.7, 10963 Berlin–Kreuzberg; map
Wed–Mon, 10–19h

The Cool and the Cold: Painting in the USA and the USSR 1960–1990, until 09.01.2022

You can book tickets online.

@gropiusbau

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