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SOUNDS OF ICELAND — FOUR DAYS OF CROSSING MUSICAL GENRES AT THE KONZERTHAUS

SOUNDS OF ICELAND — FOUR DAYS OF CROSSING MUSICAL GENRES AT THE KONZERTHAUS

Icelandic music is known for having no reservations about crossing genres or crossing oceans and borders – this time all the way to the heart of Berlin for “Sounds of Iceland“, a four-day festival at Konzerthaus Berlin. Starting next week (14.–17.11.2019) the beautiful concert hall at Gendarmenmarkt will host a celebration of musical talent from the volcanic island, bringing together an eclectic line-up of artists such as jazz quartet ADHD, whose performances inspired by the forces of nature will transport you to a sky full of northern lights; multi-instrumentalist and singer Jófríður Ákadóttir of JFDR, deservingly deemed “the next Björk”; and artist in residence Víkingur Ólafsson, who will close the festival with a performance accompanied by the Iceland Symphony Orchestra. Our tip: let the music wash over you at the Singer-Songwriter Night as Sóley, Snorri and their guests give a glimpse into how Icelanders turn the long dark nights into pure creativity! (Text: Andreea Dragos / Photos: Sebastian Runge, jfdr & Ari Magg)

Konzerthaus Berlin, Gendarmenmarkt, 10117 Berlin–Mitte; map
Sounds of Iceland“, 14–17.11.2019. Buy tickets here.
@konzerthausberlin

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SWIMMING AGAINST THE ANTHROPOCENE: ANAÏS SENLI AT GALERIE IM TURM

SWIMMING AGAINST THE ANTHROPOCENE: ANAÏS SENLI AT GALERIE IM TURM

In her latest book, philosopher Donna Haraway proclaims the dawn of the “Chthulucene”, a new geologic era that will supercede the Anthropocene with its environmental pollution, the extinction of the species, and climate crisis. While the Anthropocene bears witness to the interference of mankind with the very geological essence of the planet, the Chthulucene represents a world after humanity as we know it. In some ways, the artist Anaïs Senli builds on these premises, which draw on science fiction, contemporary critique and fantastic speculation. In the exhibition The Heavy Air That Surrounds Us, Senli uses microorganisms to question the cycle of life: she chooses deep sea phytoplankton as a metaphor – drifting microorganisms which produce oxygen and yet provide the raw material for crude oil. In her drawings, Senli makes visible what is unrecognizable to the human eye, whilst constructing new utopias from evident correlations between nature, culture and fossil-fuel capitalism. (Text: Laura Storfner / Photos: Anaïs Senli, The Heavy Air That Surrounds Us, Exhibition view Galerie im Turm, 2019, photo: Eric Tschernow, Courtesy the artist and Galerie im Turm)

Galerie im Turm, Frankfurter Tor 1, 10243 Berlin–Friedrichshain; map
The Heavy Air That Surrounds Us, Anaïs Senli, running until 12.01.2020
21.11.19, 19–21h, No Matter Functions as a Border: Conversation with Regina de Miguel, María Morata and Anaïs Senli, moderated by Lena Johanna Reisner
@galerie_im_turm

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BETTINA POUSTTCHI AT THE BERLINISCHE GALERIE: BLENDING SCULPTURE, PHOTOGRAPHY AND ARCHITECTURE

BETTINA POUSTTCHI AT THE BERLINISCHE GALERIE: BLENDING SCULPTURE, PHOTOGRAPHY AND ARCHITECTURE

Twisted, entangled guard rails, bicycle stands and barricades – Bettina Pousttchi’s installations seem both familiar and fragile. These anthropomorphic sculptures, stripped of their original functions and displayed colorfully in museums, distort conceptions of freedom and security in public spaces. The Berlin-based artist works fluidly between sculpture, photography and architecture, and her works are often site-specific and engage with their surroundings. For the solo exhibition “In Recent Years” at the Berlinische Galerie, the museum itself has become an exhibit: like an ornamental net, a giant photo installation stretches across the entire glass façade of the building, evoking elements of Middle Eastern architecture. Again and again, Pousttchi succeeds, both playfully and emotionally, in interweaving supposed contrasts – such as national and social identities – through subtle interventions. A successful show that offers a conciliatory perspective on urban architecture. (Text: Hanna Komornitzyk / Photos: Berlinische Galerie, Jens Ziehe, Noshe)

Berlinische Galerie, Alte Jakobstr.124–128, 10969 Berlin–Kreuzberg; map
Wed–Mon 10–18h
In Recent Years” by Bettina Pousttchi: until 06.04.2020
@berlinischegalerie

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ROAD TRIPPING — A SURREAL CINEMATIC JOURNEY THROUGH FILM HISTORY

ROAD TRIPPING — A SURREAL CINEMATIC JOURNEY THROUGH FILM HISTORY

Since it’s halloween, here’s a tip fit for the spookiest night of the year: The beloved cult film club, the Berlin Film Society, is screening Oliver Stone’s classic “Natural Born Killers”, starring Woody Harrelson and Juliette Lewis as a ruthless pair on the run in the USA. But that’s not the only feature: the screening is a part of a series entitled “Road Tripping: The Surreal Highway in Cinema”, dedicated to the most bizarre road trips in cinematic history, including flicks like David Lynch’s “Lost Highway” and Leo Carax’s “Holy Motors”. Sometimes funny, sometimes psychedelic, sometimes disturbing – this is a film selection sure to thrill any audience. Tickets are available here. (Text: Hanna Komornitzyk / Photos: Berlin Film Society, Max Reibert, Factory Berlin)

Factory Berlin, Görlitzer Park, Lohmühlenstr.65, 12435 Berlin–Kreuzberg; map
Road Tripping: The Surreal Highway in Cinema” – a film series by Berlin Film Society
Various events, all screening 18h30–21h
@berlinfilmsoc

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“THIS PLACE” — PHOTOGRAPHIC STORIES FROM ISRAEL AND THE WEST BANK AT THE JEWISH MUSEUM BERLIN

“THIS PLACE” — PHOTOGRAPHIC STORIES FROM ISRAEL AND THE WEST BANK AT THE JEWISH MUSEUM BERLIN

When we think about Israel and the West Bank, it’s easy to get lost in the politics of the place. But what about the people? “This Place”, an exhibition at the Jewish Museum led by French photographer Frédéric Brenner, tells their stories through photos. Brenner commissioned 12 different photo artists to spend extended periods in the region, and the result is a collection of more than 200 photographs exploring themes of landscape, homeland, identity and family. Each photographer shows us a different perspective. Wendy Ewald invites people to tell their own stories by photographing themselves and their daily lives in the region. Meanwhile photographer Jungjin Lee‘s landscape photographs are characterized by a melancholic, simple beauty. Her large-scale images of the desert point to the region’s conflict, managing to be both poignant and serene at the same time. The exhibition is an intimate, but above all human account of Israel and the West Bank, a region where life is so often dogged by international geopolitics. (Text: Lisa Strube / Photos: Frédéric Brenner & Jens Ziehe)

Jewish Museum Berlin, Lindenstr.9–14, 10969 Berlin–Kreuzberg; map
Mon–Sun 10–20h
This Place” Photo Exhibition , running until 05.01.2020. Guided tours every Sunday at 14h.
@jmberlin.de

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