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AIRING OUT — OPEN-AIR FESTIVAL IN THE HUMBOLDT FORUM’S SCHLÜTER COURTYARD

AIRING OUT — OPEN-AIR FESTIVAL IN THE HUMBOLDT FORUM’S SCHLÜTER COURTYARD

Let’s get some fresh air in here, please! That’s something we’ve often heard, said or thought these past few weeks as we’ve been fanning ourselves. The open-air summer festival Airing Out in the Schlüter Courtyard at the Humboldt Forum is just what we needed. For four long weekends – from Thursday to Sunday – there will be a fresh breeze of culture in the form of music, words, art and performances, all outdoors and for free. Artists, activists and performers will present diverse concerts and DJ sets: soulful rhythms, Afro Disco, pop and traditional Anatolian music, French-Moroccan psychedelic rock and Congolese sounds with reggae and jazzy vibes. International and interdisciplinary, the program includes discussions, films and live performances by local, international, transcultural and cross-genre artists who explore questions and forms of civil and artistic protest.

Pop-up installations and the Schöneberg Youth Museum will be a part of the program, and there will be numerous activities for children and young people such as the open-air picture book cinema and theater for children on Saturdays. A highlight is bound to be the German premiere of the play “City Horses” as part of the Tanz im August festival. One thing is for sure: Berlin is getting hotter and hotter and a refreshing breath of air and culture is what we have been longing for.
Text: Alison Musch / Photos: Xander Heinl & Sebastian Kempff

Schlüter Courtyard at Humboldt Forum, Schlossplatz, 10178 Berlin–Mitte; map

Airing Out open air in the Schlüter Courtyard
Until 20.08.2022 Thu, Fri & Sat

@humboldtforum

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CELEBRATING THE CLUB THAT PUT BERLIN ON THE DANCE MUSIC MAP — TRESOR 31 AT KRAFTWERK

CELEBRATING THE CLUB THAT PUT BERLIN ON THE DANCE MUSIC MAP — TRESOR 31 AT KRAFTWERK

March 13, 1991: a crowd of club kids from East and West Berlin descend into the vault of a former department store on Leipziger Straße. Behind a giant steel door is a bare basement where, for the first time, ravers dance to Detroit techno until the morning light. Fast forward to today and the name of that club – Tresor – will be familiar to anyone with even a passing interest in nightlife. But how did it actually feel to step out onto that hallowed dance floor all those nights ago? A new exhibition at Kraftwerk Berlin, Tresor 31: Techno, Berlin und die große Freiheit, brings back the now-demolished club as it marks 31 years since that opening night (covid prevented a 30th bash). Indeed, one exhibit goes so far as to recreate the original space: “Stomping Ground” by Dutch artist Anne de Vries looks like Egyptian ruins but is in fact a lifesize Tresor carved out of sand complete with subwoofers, beer crates and toilet cubicles. It is the highlight of an exhibition that includes three floors of filmed interviews, private photos, vinyl records and faxes that document the club’s heydey.

As you make your way through the industrial bowels of Kraftwerk – a building that houses the present-day Tresor – soundscapes, interviews and music from the club’s namesake label are pumped into your ears via smart headphones. You hear from Tresor’s original team including flamboyant founder Dimitri Hegemann who recalls the once-in-a-lifetime chaos and freedom of post-Wall Berlin. Another interview with Hegemann’s colleague and club manager Regina Baer takes on new poignancy following the announcement of her death last month. Many of the youngsters who attended that 1991 rave will now have children of their own. You leave the exhibition hoping they too will get to feel the limitless freedom and community that pioneering spaces like Tresor made possible.

Text: Benji Haughton / Photos: Frankie Casillo

Kraftwerk Berlin, Köpenicker Str.70, 10179 Berlin–Mitte; map
Tresor 31: Techno, Berlin und die große Freiheit runs until 28.08.2022. Tickets can be purchased online.

@kraftwerkberlinofficial

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LOUISE BOURGEOIS AT GROPIUS BAU: LIFE AS TEXTILE ART

LOUISE BOURGEOIS AT GROPIUS BAU: LIFE AS TEXTILE ART

The sculptor Louise Bourgeois began weaving experiences and feelings from her own life into her art at an early age. But it was not until she was in her 80s that she began sewing and mending fabric. It was in her blood: her mother ran a tapestry workshop in a suburb of Paris, and her father ran a gallery where he sold tapestries and antiques. Bourgeois’s turn to textiles in her final creative years was thus a return to her roots. The Woven Child at Gropius Bau is the first exhibition dedicated to Bourgeois’s textile works. Over 80 drawings, sculptures and installations use clothes, fabrics and memories as material to address the experience of aging. In them, Bourgeois examines what it means to be a woman, a daughter, and a mother. The work commemorates Bourgeois’s mother, exploring the idea of repair as a social metaphor for the first time.

Just as Bourgeois’s mother mended holes in precious fabrics in her workshop, sewing became a way for Bourgeois to reassemble things, overcome separation and find healing. Finding peace through fabric is a common thread running through this impressive show. Although the melancholy and enigma inherent in Bourgeois’s work remain prevalent as her career draws to a close, there is something conciliatory about the works. There is a sense of empathy that allows you to experience Bourgeois as both an artist and a human being. In her confrontations with the great themes of life – love, death, pain and forgiveness – one can also learn a lot about oneself, and that is precisely why this exhibition is worth seeing.

Text: Laura Storfner / Credit: The Easton Foundation/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2022, Photo: Luca Girardini & Credit: The Easton Foundation/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2021, Photo: Christopher Burke

Gropius Bau, Niederkirchnerstr.7, 10963 Berlin–Kreuzberg; map

Louise Bourgeois: The Woven Child, until 23.10.2022, Wed–Mon 10–19h. Tickets €9 (€6 reduced)

@gropiusbau

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BREAKING 30 YEARS OF SILENCE — FIVE CONCERTS BRING MUSIC BACK TO THE NEUE NATIONALGALERIE

BREAKING 30 YEARS OF SILENCE — FIVE CONCERTS BRING MUSIC BACK TO THE NEUE NATIONALGALERIE

As you cross the square at the Neue Nationalgalerie, you’ll reach a wide stone balustrade. During these long summer days, the granite is warm from the sun, and nothing is more lovely than lying on it and listening to the sounds of the city as you gaze down into the sculpture garden far below. You can spend hours watching people look at art here, in this modernist Elysium that until the 1980s hosted regular outdoor concerts. Now, after a thirty-year hiatus, new director Klaus Biesenbach is finally resuming that tradition: every weekend for five weeks the garden will host a 45-minute performance. The multi-genre program is called Sound in the Garden and features ÄliceWandermüdAykuCaner teker & Niksi and Deep Gold Band. What ties the acts together is the inspiration behind their pieces, namely the gallery’s current collection “The Art of Society” which will stay open until 22h on the dates of the concerts. After listening, you can go back and see if you can find the inspiring works or discover your very own favorites among art by Renée Sintenis (who, by the way, designed the Berlin Bear), David Black, Bernhard Heiliger and Henri Laurens.
 
Text: Hilka Dirks / Photos: Ludwig Windstosser & Agustin Farias / Credit: VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2022

Sound in the Garden at the Neue Nationalgalerie, Potsdamer Str.50, 10785 Berlin–Schöneberg; map

Admission and bar from 19h. You can find the full program here.

@neue_nationalgalerie

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CINEMA UNDER THE SKY — OUR PICKS FOR OPEN AIR FILMS IN AUGUST

CINEMA UNDER THE SKY — OUR PICKS FOR OPEN AIR FILMS IN AUGUST

As we enter August, the fever of summer starts to give way to lethargy as the city empties out and the asphalt radiates heat into the night. It’s the perfect vibe for some open-air cinema, and a particularly nice place for it is Haus der Kulturen der Welt, which is celebrating the last days of the Wassermusik: Mississippi festival this weekend (05 & 06.08.2022). Curated by journalist and musician Detlef Diederichsen, the program of film, concerts and literature focuses on the dark legacy of American slavery, racism and music. Finishing up the festival is Roberto Minervini’s 2018 documentary “What You Gonna Do When the World’s on Fire?”, which will be shown this Saturday at 22h under the stars at HKW’s Westgarten. Meanwhile, over at Checkpoint Charlie you’ll find more political cinema throughout the month of August. Germany’s Federal Agency for Civic Education has assembled a program of films under the banner “Ungleich!” (“Unequal!”) that features some independent picks. Tonight’s (04.08) screenings include Sebastián Lelio’s “A Fantastic Woman” and “Borga” by York Fabian-Raabe.

If the former wasteland of Checkpoint Charlie leaves you a little cold, Yorck Kinos and Arte offer an alternative in the form of their summer film program in the courtyard of Schloss Charlottenburg and at the Kulturforum at Potsdamer Platz. Bringing cinema to architectural icons, the line-up features new releases like “Corsage” with Luxembourgish actor Vicky Krieps alongside classics like David Lynch’s “Mulholland Drive”. When the curtain falls and you make the journey home through the balmy night, your mind full of images, you remember the joy that is open air cinema. 

Text: Hilka Dirks / Credit: HKW, Silke Briel; Yorck Kinogruppe, Mari Firyn; Grandfilm

HKW Wassermusik, John–Foster–Dulles-Allee 10, 10557 Berlin–Tiergarten; map

Open Air Kino am Checkpoint Charlie, Schützenstr.2, 10117 Berlin–Mitte; map

Sommerkino am Kulturforum, Matthäikirchplatz 4, 10785 Berlin–Tiergarten; map

Sommerkino Schloss Charlottenburg, Spandauer Damm 10, 14059 Berlin–Charlottenburg; map

@hkw_berlin
@bpb_de
@sommerkino.berlin

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