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LISTEN AND WIND DOWN: FIVE PODCAST TIPS FOR SELF CARE AND MINDFULNESS

LISTEN AND WIND DOWN: FIVE PODCAST TIPS FOR SELF CARE AND MINDFULNESS

How can we stay calm and content in our turbulent world? A great starting point is self care and mindfulness – two practices which feature in all five of these podcasts, starting with the five-minute audio “thoughts” from Radio Headspace. These mini episodes explore a different topic every day, teaching us ways we can become more connected to others and fulfil our potential. Started by former monk Andy Puddicombe who runs the meditation app of the same name, these affirming stories are beautifully recorded and leave you feeling ready to tackle the day. If it’s pure meditation you are looking for, A Mindful Mess will fill your feed with regular themed practices (topics include “Sofort Entspannung” and “Emotionales Bewusstsein“) plus longer episodes that feature conversations with guests on the topic of personal development. Speaking to everyone from teachers to authors, host Madeleine Alizadeh discusses themes like confidence and happiness and follows each chat with a meditation to seal the learning.

Confidence is also at the heart of Fette Gedanken, the podcast launched in March 2021 that offers you a dose of audio self-love every week. Its host, “body acceptance activist” Charlotte Kuhrt, is here to tell you that you are worthy of love no matter how you look or live your life. In each episode Charlotte takes a theme – be it clothes, sex or body shame – and unpicks it, giving you tools to change how you perceive yourself and reach a more positive mental space. Finding your Happy Place is what broadcaster and author Fearne Cotton’s hit podcast is all about. In weekly episodes, Fearne gets together with inspiring artists, healers and leaders to hear how they deal with life’s hurdles. With a lineup of guests that has included Jonathan Van NessHillary Clinton and Deepak Chopra, you are guaranteed to get some surprises in your feed. Finally, when you are ready to let all the day’s stress fade and drift off to sleep, Einschlafen mit Wikipedia is the twice-weekly podcast that combines the in-depth knowledge of Wikipedia with the soothing voices of Tilman Böhnke and Josefine Wozniak. In each recording, the pair read out an article from the web encyclopedia – from fast food to pigeons – that will have you snoozing in no time. And even if you don’t drift off, you can at least become an expert in all things water buffalo

Text: Benji Haughton / Photo: Nubelson Fernandes

Radio HeadspaceA Mindful MessFette GedankenHappy PlaceEinschlafen mit Wikipedia

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INDIEKINO CLUB — STREAMING SERVICE FROM BERLIN CINEMAS FOR INDEPENDENT FILM ON YOUR HOME SCREEN

INDIEKINO CLUB — STREAMING SERVICE FROM BERLIN CINEMAS FOR INDEPENDENT FILM ON YOUR HOME SCREEN

Quality over quantity is an oft-quoted mantra, but when it comes to movies it really is true. It’s a fact that the folks behind the Indiekino Club film streaming service know very well. Launched in February 2021 as a collaboration between ten Berlin indie cinemas and editors of Indiekino magazine Hendrike Bake and Thomas Dorow, the project is a true labor of film love. On the face of it, the platform is similar to the major streaming services: you pay a modest monthly charge that lets you stream a selection of films any time you like. But that’s where the similarities end. The club is run like an independent cinema, with a selection of up to 20 art house films in regular rotation. Every week, new movies take the place of old ones, so there are always new flicks to see. As for the library, the curation tends towards smaller international productions as opposed to the latest blockbusters.

Among the selection are some real gems, like the 2013 Japanese drama “Like Father, Like Son”, a tale of fatherhood and society that got a ten-minute standing ovation when it premiered at Cannes, and “Birds of Passage”, a 2018 Colombian-Danish co-production that follows a family’s involvement in the rise of drug trafficking in Colombia (you can view the full selection online). If, like us, you can’t wait to see films on the big screen again, there’s good news here too: membership to the club also includes a card which will get you a discount at the partner cinemas when they reopen. Count us in!

Text: Benji Haughton / Film stills: Gott existiert ihr Name ist Petrunya Petrunya mit Puppe & Like Father / Photo: Ksenia Chernaya

Indiekino Club – you can sign up for a subscription on the website.

@indiekino

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REVISITING THE WORKS OF A MUSIC PIONEER — HALIM EL-DABH AT SAVVY CONTEMPORARY

REVISITING THE WORKS OF A MUSIC PIONEER — HALIM EL-DABH AT SAVVY CONTEMPORARY

Through light and sound installations, sculptures, paintings and video as well as interactive music pieces Here History Began. Tracing the Re/verberations of Halim El-Dabh (until 09.05.2021) revisits the work and life of Eqyptian composer, ethnomusicologist, musician, pan-Africanist and philosopher, Halim El-Dabh (1921-2017). A result of five years of research, the group exhibition is a comprehensive physical archive and embodiment of El-Dabh’s work and those he has inspired. El-Dabh was largely left out of conversations surrounding the rise of electronic music, something that this retrospective puts right, revealing his great influence and establishing his place in the history of composition. Entering the gallery, one of the first pieces to catch your eye is Leo Asemota’s neon light installation featuring the words “ideas express you”. This notion – that ideas live beyond the physical being – is one that is embodied throughout this show.

Also visible are Lorenzo Sandoval’s archive curtains, which hang from the ceiling and are covered in prints with information and context about El-Dabh and his musical history. The space is dark, creating an almost sombre atmosphere, though light can be seen emanating from a huge screen behind Asemota’s work which presents Black Quantum Futurism’s video piece “Time Travel Experiments” exploring generational paradoxes and voyages through time. The darkness continues as you venture down to Savvy Contemporary’s basement where Vivian Caccuri’s sound installation occupies the room with fleeting noises of mosquitoes flying past you. The basement also houses what used to be an old industrial fridge, a space used here for Emeka Ogboh’s immersive installation of El-Dabh works that merges video, audio and physical elements. Take your shoes off before entering, sit down and let the sounds and rhythms of Halim El-Dabh take over your mind, body and spirit…

Text: Lottie Mac / Photos: Merle Büttner

Savvy Contemporary, Reinickendorfer Str.17, 13347 Berlin–Wedding; map
Thu–Sun 14–19h

Here History Began runs until 09.05.2021
Tickets can be reserved free of charge online. Negative Covid-19 test required.

@savvycontemporary

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FUTURE SCENARIOS AT SUN RISE / SUN SET GROUP EXHIBITION AT SCHINKEL PAVILLON

FUTURE SCENARIOS AT SUN RISE / SUN SET GROUP EXHIBITION AT SCHINKEL PAVILLON

This exhibition begins not with your eyes, but your nose. As soon as you enter the Schinkel Pavillon, you can smell Pamela Rosenkranz’s installation, which takes up much of the gallery’s main room. A mound of earth sits bathed in green neon light, rising all the way up to the ceiling of the octagon-shaped building and filling it with smells of forest, compost and dust. But there’s another aroma that hangs here: Rosenkranz has infused the earth with Calvin Klein’s “Obsession for men”, a fragrance that is marketed as an appealing, masculine scent. The advertising promise rings true – at least if you are a jaguar or a leopard, since they are particularly attracted to the civet oil that is used to make such perfumes and which is found in the animal kingdom. This raises an interesting question that runs through the whole show: what is human in animals and what is animalistic in humans?

Animals also make frequent appearances in French artist Pierre Huyghe’s piece. Located in a darker corner of the Pavillon, the work features live Mexican cave fish that are naturally blind, yet glide effortlessly through Huyghe’s enchanted aquarium world. Juxtaposed with them is a disturbingly beautiful swampland created by surrealist Max Ernst and a pendulum drawing by 19th century Swiss artist Emma Kunz, who throughout her life saw herself as a medium and healer. All three works attempt to dissolve the boundaries between nature, culture and spirit. In Kunz’s trance-like dream scenes, the invisible forces that hold the cosmos together become clear. This tightrope between beauty and horror is a theme that emerges throughout this group show. But no matter how bleak these alternative realities appear at first glance, they are all united by the promise of a world in which fauna and flora, humans and technology become one.

The exhibition was open at the time of publication. For the latest Covid-19 updates check the Schinkel Pavillon website.

Text: Laura Storfner / Credit: Pierre Huyghe; Marian Goodman Gallery, New York; Hauser & Wirth, London; Esther Schipper, Berlin; and Chantal Crousel, Paris; VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2020; Rachel Rose, Borns2019, Pilar Corrias Gallery, London; Henri Rousseau, La Belle et la bête, c. 1908, bpk / Nationalgalerie, SMB, Sammlung Scharf-Gerstenberg; Pamela Rosenkranz, Infection (Calvin Klein Obsession for Men), 2021, Sprüth Magers, Berlin; Precious Okoyomon, Ditto Ditto, 2020; Schinkel Pavillon / Photos: Alex Delfanne & Andrea Rossetti

Schinkel Pavillon, Oberwallstr.1, 10117 Berlin–Mitte; map
Sun Rise / Sun Set – until 25.07.2021
Fri–Sun 12–19h, by appointment only

@schinkelpavillon

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FREE OUTDOOR ART — A WALK THROUGH SCULPTURES IN PUBLIC SPACES

FREE OUTDOOR ART — A WALK THROUGH SCULPTURES IN PUBLIC SPACES

Fancy some new scenery for your daily walk? Why not turn your next stroll into a scavenger hunt, with works of art as your prizes. Your guide is Jörg Johnen, who presents more than 100 outdoor artworks in his charming book Marmor für Alle that we featured back in 2019. The tour begins in Mitte and heads towards Tiergarten, stopping off at familiar works as well as some new additions. Our starting point is the Kolonnadenhof on the Museum Island, where a work by conceptual artist Jenny Holzer has been newly installed. Her aluminium plaque featuring the inscription “Men don’t protect you anymore” is easy to miss, but the message is all the more forceful for it. Feminist art is also notable in Austrian artist Valie Export’s work Doppelgängerin, a four-meter-tall sculpture made of intertwined scissors that stands menacingly in front of Unter den Linden’s PalaisPopulaire. Walk a few steps further onto Bebelplatz and you come across Micha Ullman’s memorial to the burning of books: a window set into the ground reveals a view down into a vault full of empty bookshelves. The work does not impose itself, but impressively highlights what has been taken, commemorating the more than 20,000 banned books that were thrown into the fire by the Nazis in this very place in 1933.
 

When you visit Ólafur Elíasson’s Windspiegelwand, at the back of the GIZ (German Corporation for International Cooperation) building near Potsdamer Platz, it’s best to choose a sunny day. In sunlight the countless stainless steel plates of the structure reflect the shimmering water of the neighboring Pianosee. Heading on over the Potsdamer Brücke, you come across Norbert Radermacher’s heavy bronze model of a lifebuoy attached to the railings. Further on, in front of the PSM gallery on Schöneberger Ufer, artist Ariel Reichman presents an interactive work that questions our sense of security: using a QR code you can make the neon installation in the garden illuminate. Finally, around the corner at Haunt on Kluckstraße are works by the Frontviews art collective. The space is due to reopen 23.03.2021; in the meantime you can view their outdoor show in the overgrown courtyard. The works demonstrate just how effective contemporary sculpture in urban nature can be.

Text: Laura Storfner / Credit: Ariel Reichman & PSM, Berlin, 2020; Philipp Modersohn; Die Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit, Berlin, 2001 & Studio Ólafur Elíassons / Photos: Marjorie Brunet Plaza, Stephan Klee & Jens Ziehe

Jenny Holzer – Men don’t protect you anymore, Kolonnadenhof at Museum Island, 10178 Berlin–Mitte; map

Valie Export – Die Doppelgängerin, in front of PalaisPopulaire, Unter den Linden 5, 10117 Berlin–Mitte; map

Micha Ullman – Empty Library memorial, Bebelplatz, Unter den Linden, 10117 Berlin–Mitte; map

Olafur Eliasson – Windspiegelwand, behind the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), Reichpietschufer 20, 10785 Berlin–Tiergarten; map

Ariel Reichman – This is WorseI AM (NOT) SAFE neon installation, until 10.04.2021. PSM, Schöneberger Ufer 61, 10785 Berlin–Tiergarten; map

Outdoor exhibition for Concrete #1: RESPIRATION, until 27.03.2021 in the courtyard of Frontviews at HAUNT, Kluckstr.23A, 10785 Berlin–Tiergarten; map
Wed–Fri 14–19h

@palaispopulaire
@psmgallery
@frontviews_berlin
@haunt_berlin

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