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BERTIE — THE NEW NYC-STYLE BISTRO WITH A BAR CONCEPT AND SHARING PLATES

BERTIE — THE NEW NYC-STYLE BISTRO WITH A BAR CONCEPT AND SHARING PLATES

If you enjoy meeting friends for long brunches, you’ve probably been to Annelies or Distrikt Coffee a few times already. The concept at Annelies is simple: the food is made with seasonal and regional ingredients and, in addition to menu classics, there are unusual dishes you’re unlikely to find elsewhere. With their new (third) location, Sophie Hardy, Hannes Haake and Matthew Maue offer you the same kitchen concept, as an evening version. Since Bertie’s soft opening at the beginning of May 2024, you can try chef and co-founder Matthew’s dishes virtually every hour of the day. The large, floor-to-ceiling French windows give you a taste of what awaits you inside. The wooden benches are reminiscent of classic American diner booths and the bar counter with its steel bistro stools transports you to NYC. Bertie not only draws on the metropolis for its interior design but also its menu. No wonder, because Matthew grew up in the US’s big cities and has tasted his way through New York, Chicago, Brooklyn, San Francisco and beyond. Most of his interpretations are served as sharing plates and bar snacks, making them particularly suitable for a quick detour to the bar.

Deviled eggs with smoked egg yolk and chives, marinated mushrooms, flatbread with bouillabaisse, mussels and saffron aioli, or a Caesar schnitzel with salad, parmesan, and gravy — the menu is fun and, with its different portion sizes and varied selection, leaves little to be desired. The deep-fried potatoes with bouillon seasoning and lemon aioli and the buffalo wings with ranch and celery have already become my clear favorites. Those with a sweet tooth will love the banana pudding with salted peanuts and caramel sauce (I promise!). There are also classic cocktails such as negronis, margaritas and pisco sours, draft beer, natural wines, and a fine selection of non-alcoholic drinks. All good things come in threes, as Sophie, Hannes and Matthew prove once again with their new bistro, Bertie. Incidentally, reservations are not possible here for the time being, and this is how it will remain in the future.

Text & Photos: Robyn Steffen

Bertie, Schwedter Str.13, 10119 Berlin–Prenzlauer Berg; map

@bertieberlin

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GOT OATS? — PLANT-BASED YOGURT FOR DAIRY-FREE FERMENTS

GOT OATS? — PLANT-BASED YOGURT FOR DAIRY-FREE FERMENTS

My pantry is full of weird and wonderful things that I’ve bought over the years in the hope that I will finally start eating breakfast. The latest initiative is turmeric porridge, though I’m already planning my next breakfast era, namely the plant-based yogurt alternative from Oatly. Ok, so they’re not strictly a breakfast food, but they do go well with the usual morning staples: granola, muesli, berries and chia seeds, among others. Cutely named Oatgurt, the yoghurts come in vanilla, blueberry, strawberry and mango/peach/passion fruit flavors, though they also do plain if, like me, you prefer to keep things uncomplicated until 9 in the morning at the earliest. The unsweetened version is pleasingly creamy and is made with live bacteria cultures that give it a slight tang. Plant-based yogurts can, of course, be used wherever you’d use regular yogurt: tzatziki, raita, soups, pasta sauces, marinades etc. As for me, I’ll be keeping them at the front of the fridge for a breakfast that’s (hopefully) worth getting out of bed for…

Text: Scott Moss / Photos: Sophie Doering

P.S. Check out our recipe for vegan granola on our Instagram @ceeceeberlin.

Oatgurt is available at Rewe, Edeka and Kaufland amongst other retailers.

@oatly

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ITALIAN POSTMODERNISM, BAUHAUS & MOMENTS OF POP CULTURE UNITED IN THE NEW LABEL BOTTONE

ITALIAN POSTMODERNISM, BAUHAUS & MOMENTS OF POP CULTURE UNITED IN THE NEW LABEL BOTTONE

At the beginning of February 2024, there was a little sneak peak with prototypes and teasers at VooSpace, two months later they took their debut collection to the Salone del Mobile in Milan, and now they are exhibiting their furniture and contemporary objects in their own showroom in the former Cee Cee office: With alternating bursts of nostalgia and joy, we fell in love with Bottone‘s pacchetto completo during the opening and are delighted that the two founders and brothers Michele and Daniele Luciano Ferrazzano are once again bringing lots of passion (and sounds!) to the space. Having grown up in Stuttgart with Italian parents, the influences of both cultures are combined in the label: Italian postmodernism and Bauhaus, moments of pop culture and the precision of craftsmanship are closely interwoven – resulting in eight objects for the first collection that are not only expressive and contemporary in form and color, but also have a lot to offer in terms of sound. Daniele and Michele have been making music themselves for years, so it was clear to them from the outset that they wanted to create their own sounds for their joint label.

You can listen to the results on their website, where the individual objects are not accompanied by texts but by composed pieces of music. And anyone who listens to them will quickly appreciate the omission of the textual level, because nothing could portray the pieces of furniture and their character more faithfully and beautifully than the music of the founders themselves. Sometimes they want to be loud, sometimes fun, sometimes restrained in their wholeness without being less impressive. My body resonates in an S-shape while listening to the “S-Tisch” track, while listening to the “Zooomrug” makes me feel like a little beetle slowly crawling through the interwoven individual parts and enjoying them more and more by time. How nice it can be to simply listen to a piece of furniture.

Text: Robyn Steffen / Photos: Artur De Menezes, Julia Sang Nguyen & Robyn Steffen

Bottone Showroom, Leipziger Str.66, 10117 Berlin–Mitte; map

@bottone_objects

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BEAUTIFUL OBJECTS & LOVELY PEOPLE: SUNDAYS IN THE COURTYARD AT ANDREAS MURKUDIS’ CHARITY MARKET

BEAUTIFUL OBJECTS & LOVELY PEOPLE: SUNDAYS IN THE COURTYARD AT ANDREAS MURKUDIS’ CHARITY MARKET

What could be better than spending a May Sunday afternoon with warm people in the open air? With snacks, a chilled drink and beautiful objects? If this plan appeals to you, the Andreas Murkudis team is looking forward to seeing you. It’s best to bring all your friends because more is more at the third edition of the Sunday Charity Market. The last edition raised almost 100,000 euros for a good cause, and, hopefully, it will be even more this time. The proceeds from the market go to two NGOs committed to sea rescue — many people die each year trying to escape war and poverty by sea. SOS Humanity has already rescued more than 35,000 people from distress at sea in the central Mediterranean with its rescue ship Humanity 1. And #LeaveNoOneBehind coordinates civilian sea rescues with various partners.

If you’re looking for inspiration, there will be books and art. But also practical and beautiful things like fashion, furniture and cosmetics. We have our eye on the beautiful water glasses from Vogel Studio — ideal for summer drinks on the balcony. The distinctive black chair by Klemens Grund for Tecta is also on the wish list, adding a touch of chicness to any room. And who would say no to a Dries van Noten wedge? There will be many wonderful pieces because if there’s one Berliner who has been demonstrating excellent taste for years, it’s Andreas Murkudis and his team. I have every confidence in the overall concept of this event. See you Sunday in the beautiful courtyard on Potsdamer, right?

Text: Nina Trippel / Photos: Sebastian Beyrer

Andreas Murkudis, Potsdamer Str.81, 77, 98, 10785 Berlin–Tiergarten; map

@andreasmurkudis

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HANS BALUSCHEK AT THE BRÖHAN MUSEUM: BERLIN BETWEEN SPIRITUALISM AND SOCIAL CRITICISM

HANS BALUSCHEK AT THE BRÖHAN MUSEUM: BERLIN BETWEEN SPIRITUALISM AND SOCIAL CRITICISM

The painter Hans Baluschek was known for his critical view of Berlin’s society around 1900. He kept to the fringes of society and portrayed city dwellers, workers and the poor who were scarred by life. The staunch social democrat never showed off his models. Almost lovingly, he let the shady street corners and the figures who inhabited them shine in the light of street lamps and cigarette burns. The Bröhan Museum is now showing a side of Baluschek that has remained in the dark, until now. In the unembellished scenes of Berlin’s working class, enigmatic details repeatedly appear that move beyond the typical realism of the time. The exhibition shows that, although Baluschek painted truthfully on the surface, he alluded to spiritualism and witchcraft between the layers of paint. Following the curators’ line of interpretation, there is a second world behind the harsh reality and misery.

At first glance, his painting “Families can make coffee here” may seem like a familiar excursion scene from back then. The title of the painting is a reference to an old Berlin custom that appealed to guests from the working class and petit bourgeoisie. They brought their ground coffee and food and only paid for borrowed crockery, milk and hot water. However, if you know about Baluschek’s interest in the occult, you cannot help but see the scene in a new light. Aren’t the ladies a little reminiscent of witches mixing potions and tinctures? Or is this even a case of fortune-telling from the coffee grounds? Baluschek has left many hints and conspicuous features in his work. The exhibition offers new possibilities for interpretation and thus achieves something remarkable: it exhibits a familiar painter in an entirely new light.

Text: Laura Storfner / Photos: Martin Adam / Credit: Hans Baluschek, Bröhan-Museum, Berlin

Bröhan-Museum, Schloßstr.1a., 14059 Berlin–Charlottenburg; map
Secret Codes. Hans Baluschek’s Painting Re-Read! until 01.09.2024

@broehan_museum

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