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HERBIE UNVERPACKT: PLASTIC-FREE BOUTIQUE FOR FRESH GROCERIES AND PANTRY SUPPLIES BY THE LANDWEHRKANAL

HERBIE UNVERPACKT: PLASTIC-FREE BOUTIQUE FOR FRESH GROCERIES AND PANTRY SUPPLIES BY THE LANDWEHRKANAL

Having grown up in a zero waste community in Sicily, it’s hardly surprising that Carmela La Spina wanted to bring a piece of that culture to Berlin. And so after a 2020 crowdfunding campaign, Carmela and Martin Hofmann opened packaging-free Herbie Unverpackttogether in the autumn. Their goal? To make no-plastic groceries available to as many Berliners as possible and establish a zero waste community of exchange and support. Located between Neukölln and Treptow, this charming boutique offers organic basics including rescued fruit and vegetables from Querfeld (simply pre-order online and pick up in-store), nuts and pasta from the dispenser, baked goods from Albatross and natural cosmetics. Also available are nappies and hygiene products from Imse Vimse that feature reusable textiles. The store has both essentials and specialities, and if you have left your jars and bags at home the team will gladly lend or sell you one. The motto here is “packaging-free with love” and we are really feeling it.

Text: Sophie Döring / Photos: Stefany de Beur

Herbie Unverpackt, Elbestr.19, 12045 Berlin–Neukölln; map
Mon–Fri 12–19h, Sat 12–17h

The shop is classed as a supermarket and thus open as normal. Extensive measures are in place for safe shopping.

@herbieunverpackt

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KNIT KNIT: WOOL AND KNITTING SETS FOR DESIGN-SAVVY WEAVERS — FOR DELIVERY AND PICK-UP

KNIT KNIT: WOOL AND KNITTING SETS FOR DESIGN-SAVVY WEAVERS — FOR DELIVERY AND PICK-UP

Are you still missing something woolly to keep you warm this winter? How about a knitting project of your own! Knitting shop Knit Knit has special kits with all you need to get busy with wool, whether it’s a yak yarn scarf with a ribbed pattern, a fluffy cardigan made of silk mohair or a fluffy hat coarsely knitted with the brand’s water-repellent Woohoo wool. The Mitte shop was founded in 2012 by project manager Lisa Benischek and artist Belinda Sykora, two friends passionate about knitting, and offers a diverse range of knitting sets for beginners and pros alike. The packages come complete with wool, knitting instructions and a practical storage bag, with the knitting patterns by Danish designer Mette from PetiteKnit a particular highlight. If you already have yarn in your favourite color at home you can also buy patterns for everything from scarfs and pullovers to baby clothes and cardigans. And if you need inspiration for your next knitting project, check out Instagram for some great creative examples. Say it together: wool is cool.

Text: Nicole Meckel / Photos: Birgit Kaulfuss

Knit Knit, Linienstr.154, 10115 Berlin–Mitte; map
You can order for delivery or pick-up via email, phone or Whatsapp (030 98366430)
Pick-up: Tue–Sat 15–17h

@knitknitberlin

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ROOTS RADICALS: DELIVERING HANDMADE FERMENTS, CONSERVES AND SAUCES WITH A ZERO-WASTE ETHOS

ROOTS RADICALS: DELIVERING HANDMADE FERMENTS, CONSERVES AND SAUCES WITH A ZERO-WASTE ETHOS

Pickling and fermenting are all the rage at the moment, and for good reason: chutneys, conserves and vinegars are the perfect shortcut to flavor for all kinds of meals. And when it comes to preserving prowess, Berlin-based Roots Radicals are taking things to the next level with their handcrafted regional ferments. Founded in late 2019 by Peruvian-born scientist, chef and artist Monica Kisic, the project is unique in putting a commitment to zero waste at the forefront. For Monica, this means more than just cutting food waste: her preserves are actually created from “up-cycled” produce which would otherwise be thrown away. But the most impressive part is the diversity and quality of the food that results, with everything from relishes and chutneys to kimchi, spices and salsas. Take Monica’s organic ketchup, for instance, which is made from 82 percent “rescued” ingredients and bottled during peak tomato season for maximum flavor and minimum environmental impact. The range is as well suited for day-to-day cooking (rescued vegetable bouillon for vibrant soups) as for special occasions (luxurious steamed strawberries for an indulgent champagne accompaniment) and most of the products will last for months in your larder. A delivery of these fermented goodies is just the thing to breathe new life into your lockdown home cooking while helping tackle food waste.

Text: Benji Haughton / Photos: Savannah van der Niet, Becca Crawford, Carina Dewhurst & Michael Sieber

Roots Radicals ferments can be ordered online, with deliveries typically on Friday, 11–17h. Delivery areas are Prenzlauer Berg, Mitte, Friedrichshain, Kreuzberg, Neukölln and Schöneberg. Minimum order €20. Select products are also available on Up and Coming.

@rootsradicals.berlin

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DADDY MAGAZINE: BERLIN ZINE FOR UNTOLD STORIES AND CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES

DADDY MAGAZINE: BERLIN ZINE FOR UNTOLD STORIES AND CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES

How can writers use the isolation of lockdown to make something new? For Berlin-based online publication Daddy, the answer was to go all out with their first ever print magazine issue, Together. Behind the zine are co-founders Kemi Fatoba(also of Vogue Germany) and Joe von Hutch, who since 2016 have been elevating underrepresented voices both in Berlin and beyond with topical stories on culture, identity and race. Now you can read this journalism in print with 130 thoughtfully-designed matte pages of interviews, fictional works, photo spreads and poetry putting the perspectives of people of color and queer persons front and center. Story-wise, this zine has it all: a profile on fierce local ballroom collective House of Saint Laurent, a reflective article on being Black and British in Berlin, and an exposé on the racist nature of facial recognition technology to name just a few of the articles. Despite the breadth of topics covered, the magazine is still cohesive, with ideas of community, solidarity and intimacy coming up again and again. And while the tone is always critical, the stories leave you with a sense of optimism for the future – something we could all do with right now.

Text: Benji Haughton / Photos: Savannah van der Niet, Matias Alfonzo at Mimosa Agency & We are Daddy Media

Daddy Magazine is available exclusively for order online along with a range of merchandise which helps support the project.

@daddy.berlin

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PODCAST TIPS: FIVE ART AND DESIGN RADIO SHOWS FOR YOUR LOCKDOWN CULTURE FIX

PODCAST TIPS: FIVE ART AND DESIGN RADIO SHOWS FOR YOUR LOCKDOWN CULTURE FIX

Whether it’s an U-Bahn ride or a session in the bathtub, a good podcast can enhance any part of your daily routine. In the first of a series of features, we have gathered five art and design podcasts that offer inspiration and entertainment in equal measure. First up is 99% invisible, a show that tells the stories behind everyday design and architecture hosted by American producer Roman Mars. The series takes familiar things – from cul-de-sacs to libraries – and reflects on their design histories and significance. Next up is Berlinische Galerie’s Kunst in Berlin hosted by gallery director Thomas Köhler, who hears from artists that have had their work shown at the Kreuzberg art venue. Highlights include a conversation with Olaf Stüber, co-founder of artists’ cinema project Videoart at Midnight, that takes a look at Berlin’s lively video art scene. Staying in Berlin, Was mit Kunst is the podcast from influential city gallerist Johann König that lifts the lid on the art world with interviews featuring artists, curators and critics. Worthwhile listens include visual artist Alicja Kwade and the ever-entertaining Lars Eidinger. For design lovers, The Crit from American magazine Disegno is a new podcast packed with thoughtful analysis and reporting. Hosted by Disegno’s journalists, it includes topical stories from the design world plus deeper dives into issues like alt-right architecture. Closer by, Charlottenburg’s Villa Grisebach auction house is home to Die Sucht zu Sehen (Addiction to Seeing), an interview podcast where artists, musicians and authors tell the stories behind their works. Hosted by journalist Rebecca Casati, the fortnightly show has already heard from the likes of photographer Juergen Teller and film director Edward Berger. These conversations and stories are just what you need to get your cultural fix as we eagerly await the return of the city’s arts scene. Happy listening!

Text: Benji Haughton / Gif: Chloë Galea

99% invisibleKunst in BerlinWas mit KunstThe CritDie Sucht zu Sehen

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