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THE SOUND OF FREEDOM — RADIOLAND AT THE NEUKÖLLNER OPER

THE SOUND OF FREEDOM — RADIOLAND AT THE NEUKÖLLNER OPER

There was a time when the personal became political and young people rebelled against their parents’ generation. A time when rock music was so revolutionary that states were founded because of it: we are in Great Britain at the end of the 1960s. The BBC refuses to listen to pop, but the youth doesn’t want to be deprived of their wild musical awakening. The solution? Independent pirate radio stations on the high seas. And so the Bates family set up their own radio station on an abandoned anti-aircraft platform in international waters. When the established radio stations finally jumped on the bandwagon and started playing new music, father Roy Bates got an idea: if you can have musical freedom, what about the freedom of a state of one’s own? And so, without further ado, he established Sealand. A utopia, an ideal, an idea of freedom, whose citizenship can still be purchased on the Internet by anyone and everyone for a small sum. With its new production “Radioland – The mostly true, but always unbelievable story of the Principality of Sealand,” the Neuköllner Oper once again succeeds in creating a memorable, entertaining and profound piece about recent (pop) music history. Full of tragedy and comedy, it tells of radio piracy, freedom and how visions become reality. You will leave the show having been a witness to the founding of a state and having heard the unique sound of utopias becoming reality.

Text: Hilka Dirks / Photos: Thomas Koy för Neuköllner Oper

Neuköllner Oper, Karl-Marx-Str.131–133, 12043 Berlin–Neukölln; map

Radioland premiering 26.01.2023, runs until 26.02.2023.

@neukoellneroper

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WHERE THREADS COME TOGETHER: SEWING SESSIONS WITH STEPHANIE IMBEAU AT THE BÄRENZWINGER

WHERE THREADS COME TOGETHER: SEWING SESSIONS WITH STEPHANIE IMBEAU AT THE BÄRENZWINGER

The artist Stephanie Imbeau seeks to understand how people build connections, find refuge, and form networks. She investigates these connections as an artist in residence at Bärenzwinger. Every Thursday afternoon during her residency, she invites visitors to open Sewing Sessions: together, they will work on a single piece of art that will adorn the exhibition space like a second skin. It will be attached to scaffolding designed by Imbeau, which is part of the parallel exhibition “Roaming Winters.” In the show, she and fellow artist and resident Sujatro Ghosh aim to render communities and collective efforts visible in performance-based installations. While her current sewing project is about collaborative design and experimenting with fabric, smaller pieces will also be created in the process. “I hope that these times can be both productive and cozy,” says Stephanie Imbeau, “at least in the way of sewing circles, offering a time to work with others, while sharing stories, ideas, and presence. Anyone and everyone are welcome at her sessions – anyone who wishes is welcome to bring their own sewing machine; for everyone else, Imbeau keeps a needle and thread handy.

Text: Laura Storfner / Photos: Juan Saez

Bärenzwinger, Rungestr.30, 10179 Berlin–Mitte; map

Sewing Sessions with Stephanie Imbeau, Thursdays in January and February, 15–18h, no sign-up necessary. Roaming Winters until 26.02.2023.

@baerenzwinger.berlin
@stephanieimbeau
@anotherhere.residency

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INSTITUTIONALIZED FOREIGNNESS — MOSHTARI HILAL & SINTHUJAN VARATHARAJAH IN CONVERSATION AT CCA

INSTITUTIONALIZED FOREIGNNESS — MOSHTARI HILAL & SINTHUJAN VARATHARAJAH IN CONVERSATION AT CCA

The artist, curator, and researcher مشترى هلال (moshtari hilal) and the political geographer and essayist சிந்துஜன் வரதராஜா (sinthujan varatharajah) are no longer just an Instagram phenomenon within a small bubble of art and culture. Since establishing their Instagram Live discussion format a few years ago, in which they explore and analyze German social issues and phenomena, they have established themselves as voices in the German and Berlin art and cultural discourse. Their latest print publication, “English in Berlin,” confronts the hegemonic nature of English in the capital. CCA now brings its dialogue from the social media screen into the exhibition space. The evening’s topic, “Wer hat Angst vorm Ausländeramt?” (Who’s Afraid of the Immigration Office?) opens a cultural-historical analysis of the institution, which has recently gained an unusual pop-cultural notoriety through memes, television, and social media. Where does the sudden interest in authority come from, an authority that for Germans has mostly been background noise in local news coverage? And what is its significance for all people without a German passport in this country?

Text: Hilka Dirks / Photos: Zain Ali

مشترى هلال (moshtari hilal) &  சிந்துஜன் வரதராஜா (sinthujan varatharajah) “Wer hat Angst vor dem Ausländeramt?“— at CCA Berlin, Kurfürstenstraße 145, (entrance via Frobenstraße), 10785 Berlin–Schöneberg; map 

16.01.2023 19h. The discussion will be in German.

@ccaberlin
@varathas
@mooshtariii

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HAPPY BIRTHDAY, MARTIN KIPPENBERGER: TWO EXHIBITIONS TO MARK HIS 70TH BIRTHDAY

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, MARTIN KIPPENBERGER: TWO EXHIBITIONS TO MARK HIS 70TH BIRTHDAY

He is an artist who is sorely missed. Martin Kippenberger – the artist of the century (not to mention wisecracker, rascal, and joker) – would have turned 70 on February 25. The eighties and nineties were his playgrounds; he also worked and performed outside museums, galleries, and studios. Looking back on his life, which ended in 1997 at only 44, it seems as if he had never slept: But sleep must also have seemed negligible to someone who worked, drew, and painted tirelessly. Along the way, he helped run SO36 in Kreuzberg, played in a band, acted, and was part owner of a restaurant in Los Angeles and owner of a gas station in Brazil. In Berlin, he could be found in Paris Bar with blood sausage and wine. The galleries Max Hetzler and Capitain Petze l both dedicated exhibitions to him on his milestone birthday, commemorating various phases of his work. While Capitain Petzel will present his room-sized installation “Heavy Burschi,” which caused a sensation at the Cologne Kunstverein in 1991, starting next Friday, Hetzler will ring in the birthday celebration tomorrow. Photographs by Wilhelm Schürmann and Andrea Stappert frame Kippenberger’s works here: they show him in the studio, on the street, and in everyday life.

Text: Laura Storfner / Photos: Simon Vogel / Credit: Martin Kippenberger, heute denken – morgen fertig, 1983, Privatsammlung & Courtesy Estate of Martin Kippenberger, Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne

Max Hetzler, Goethestr.2/3, 10623 Berlin–Charlottenburg; map
Heute denken – morgen fertig, Works from private collections from the 80s and 90s. Photographs by Wilhelm Schürmann and Andrea Stappert, 13.01.–25.02.2023 Tue–Sat 11–18h

Capitain Petzel, Karl-Marx-Allee 45, 10178 Berlin–Mitte; map
Martin Kippenberger Heavy Burschi, 21.01.–18.02.2023 Tue–Sat 11–18h

@galeriemaxhetzler
@capitainpetzel

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STEPPING INTO THE NEW YEAR WITH A GOOD READ: ESSAYS AND ART BOOKS

STEPPING INTO THE NEW YEAR WITH A GOOD READ: ESSAYS AND ART BOOKS

Do your New Year’s resolutions include a desire to read more, but you don’t quite know where to start or maybe you’re just not ready for 2023? If you want to reminisce a bit about the past, we recommend “The Nineties” by essayist and cultural critic Chuck Klosterman. He drops deep into the decade, discussing everything from Nirvana’s Nevermind to Seinfeld to the re-election of Bill Clinton. Set a decade later, Hendrik Bolz’s debut, “Nullerjahre,” tells the story of Bolz, better known as rapper Testo from Zugezogen Maskulin, growing up in the prefabricated buildings of Stralsund between RTL afternoon programs, Hartz IV and neo-Nazis. Annabelle Hirsch also takes us on a journey from the past to the present. In “Die Dinge: Eine Geschichte der Frauen in 100 Objekten” (The Things: A History of Women in 100 Objects), she takes us into a cabinet of curiosities that contains numerous objects from everyday female life, from Amazon dolls to pussyhats. Some objects are tied to their time or owner, while others point beyond themselves and stand pars pro toto for the possibility of a feminine historiography.

How history, in this case art history, might be told from a woman’s point of view preoccupies Katy Hessel. The London-based curator has been exploring this question for several years with her podcast and Instagram channel, The Great Women Artists. In her new book, “The Story of Art without Men,” she focuses on women artists such as Baroque painter Artemisia Gentileschi and Expressionist pioneer Paula Modersohn-Becker. Those who want to immerse themselves in other worlds can follow in the footsteps of the great children’s book illustrator and his kind-hearted monsters with “Wild Things Are Happening: The Art of Maurice Sendak“. Art lovers should also check out Jorinde Voigt’s new publication “On Reality,” in which she presents works from the pandemic years drawn with a scalpel. Meanwhile, the Berlin-based sculptor Michael Sailstorfer takes a look back at more than 20 years of creative activity with the monograph MS 00 22, which also features more than 300 pages of his poetic and humorous spatial interventions and object transformations.

Text: Laura Storfner / Photos: Fotos: Sophie Doering & Cottonbro

The Nineties” by Chuck Klosterman (2023, Penguin Books, 384 pages)

Nullerjahre” by Hendrik Bolz (2022, Kiepenheuer & Witsch, 336 pages)

Die Dinge. Eine Geschichte der Frauen in 100 Objekten” by Annabelle Hirsch (2022, Kein & Aber, 416 pages)

The Story of Art without Men” by Katy Hessel (2022, Piper, 512 pages)

Wild Things Are Happening: The Art of Maurice Sendak” (2022, DelMonico Books, 247 pages)

On Reality” by Jorinde Voigt (2023, Hatje Cantz Verlag, 304 pages)

MS 00 22” by Michael Sailstorfer, Works 2000–2022 (2022, DCV, 320 pages)

@thegreatwomenartists

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