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LITERATURE FOR TOMORROW’S WORLD — MINI CONFERENCE HOSTED BY KAPSEL MAGAZINE

LITERATURE FOR TOMORROW’S WORLD — MINI CONFERENCE HOSTED BY KAPSEL MAGAZINE

This week there’s a literary glimmer of hope in town. At the “Zukunftsaussichten” conference organized by Kapsel, a magazine for Chinese science fiction, you are invited to think about the world of tomorrow. Held at both the Literarisches Colloquium Berlin in Wannsee and Acud in Mitte is a three-day program of readings and discussions running until tomorrow (30.09.2022). The question on everyone’s minds? The world of tomorrow and how literature can contribute to it. The event marks the publication of Kapsel’s book Kollaps und Hope Porn. 13 Zukunftsaussichten (“Collapse and Hope Porn. 13 Prospects for the Future”) which covers everything from YouTube channels run by single grandfathers to road trips, cyber voyages through foam, “somatic simultaneities” (stay with us) and “sexy transplants”. The book includes works by authors like Joshua Groß, Anna Hetzer and Rudi Nuss. In addition to these 13 mind-bending texts, there’s food for thought from authors like Dietmar Darth and Regina Kanyu to guide us towards an uncertain tomorrow.

Text: Lara Sielmann / Photos: Franz Grünewald & Yanina Isla / Graphic: Marius Wenker

Kapsel magazine’s “Zukunftsaussichten” runs until Friday (30.09.2022)

Literarisches Colloquium Berlin, Am Sandwerder 5, 14109 Berlin–Wansee; map
28.09.2022 19h30

Acud, Veteranenstr.21, 10119 Berlin–Mitte; map
29 & 30.09.2022 20h

@kapselmagazin

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NIGHT AT THE (ART) MUSEUM — LYDIA OURAHMANE HOSTS 24-HOUR PERFORMANCE AT KW

NIGHT AT THE (ART) MUSEUM — LYDIA OURAHMANE HOSTS 24-HOUR PERFORMANCE AT KW

The KW’s artworks usually spend Saturday night by themselves, but this doesn’t mean the gallery itself has to close. Quite the opposite: for the first time, the doors of the exhibition building in Auguststrasse will be open for a full 24 hours, from 11h Saturday to 11h Sunday. The occasion for this is a site-specific installation by Algerian artist Lydia Ourahmane as part of Pause, a series curated by Sofie Krogh Christensen. The series is held between the gallery’s main exhibitions, and this edition, entitled Sync, includes a collaboration with British musician Daniel Blumberg. The work deals with emotional, psychological and political contexts of material. It is about rituals, duration and eternity, body and place – literally, since visitors are invited to participate in the work by creating immersive sound construction with their heartbeats. The pulses of 24 visitors will be amplified in the space during the live sound performance.

Text: Hilka Dirks / Photos: Frank Sperling & Aidan Zamiri / Credit: Tatjana Pieters; Lydia Ourahmane & Daniel Blumberg; Aidan Zamiri

KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Auguststr.69, 10117 Berlin–Mitte; map

Pause: ­Lydia Ourahmane “sync” – 01–02.10.2022 (24 hours)

@kwinstitutofcontemporaryart

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SOMETHING OLD, SOMETHING SOFT, SOMETHING PATCHED — TEXTILE WORKS BY NIGIN BECK AT HOTO

SOMETHING OLD, SOMETHING SOFT, SOMETHING PATCHED — TEXTILE WORKS BY NIGIN BECK AT HOTO

The sensuality of things is ever present in Nigin Beck’s works: softness, beauty and lushness despite reduction. Then there’s the past and the ephemeral – a nostalgic wistfulness without kitsch that conveys the complexity and density of the meanings and stories without needing to read explanations. Tomorrow evening (30.10.2022) Beck’s new exhibition Beware o wanderer, the road is moving too opens at Hoto – Home to Artists, in a new location on Kreuzberg’s Bergmannstraße. On display are large-format textile works, which are, as always, full of emotion and history. Inspired by the aged linen she found in her godmother’s country house, Beck spent a long time searching for the right fabrics. It was the traces of time, embroidered initials, missing buttons, stains, tears, mistakes and holes that captivated her.

Few objects seem so close, so private and so protective as the fabrics on our skin. Few objects define their wearer so much while showing their marks so quickly. Having searched for a long time, Beck finally found what she was looking for in a traditional upholstery shop in northern Italy, with lengths of fabric that felt just right and which would accompany the artist and her family for several months. They were handled, wrapped and used to cover and protect her before she finally mended, repaired, restored and stretched them onto frames. Exhibited at Hoto, they unite the private and the political, stories of migration and fragility, femininity, tradition and transience, opening up a reflective space of intimacy – both of artist and of material.

Text: Hilka Dirks / Photos: Nigin Beck & Ina Niehoff

Hoto – Home to Artists, Bergmannstr.109, 10965 Berlin–Kreuzberg; map

Nigin Beck: Beware o wanderer, the road is moving too: 01–29.10.2022
Opening Fri. 30.09.2022 from 17h

@hotoberlin
@niginthekid

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FORWARD FESTIVAL — CREATIVES CONNECT AT SOLD OUT BERLIN GATHERING

FORWARD FESTIVAL — CREATIVES CONNECT AT SOLD OUT BERLIN GATHERING

With their working lives spent looking at computer screens and drawing on tablets, it’s no wonder designers don’t usually get to meet fellow creatives in person. Forward Festival, held last Thursday and Friday (22 & 23.09.2022) at Kino International, offered a rare chance to come together. We headed to the ornate cinema to pay a visit to the sold-out event, which saw digital drawers and camera clickers from all over gather to chat design, creativity, and communication. There was no shortage of ideas as a line-up of 30 speakers showed off their portfolios and revealed insider knowledge in talks hosted by graphic designer Eike König. The line-up amounted to a who’s who of influential, on-trend creatives: color-blending 3D artist Vincent Schwenk, Type legends Grilli Type and deliciously sarcastic illustrator Mr Bingo and many more were in attendance.

Over at the workshop area, designers were honing their professional skills and getting portfolios critiqued at sessions on type design and – our personal favorite – collage making.The partner for the festival was the  Senate Department for Economics, Energy and Public Enterprises, with the responsible State Secretary  Michael Biel taking to the stage. Berlin creatives were well represented too: typographer Charlotte Rohde and artist Ju Schnee took part, as did  collective _thek, who printed shirts in support of creatives and small business owners. After all this input, we left the retro venue inspired and eager to sketch, shoot and illustrate to our heart’s content. 

Text: Benji Haughton / Photos: Al Browne, Daniel Horn / Credit: Yorck Kinogruppe & Eike König

Forward Festival

@forwardfestivals

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THE DESIGNER BEHIND BERLIN’S MOST ICONIC BUILDINGS — VISIT ARCHITECT HANS SCHAROUN’S STUDIO

THE DESIGNER BEHIND BERLIN’S MOST ICONIC BUILDINGS — VISIT ARCHITECT HANS SCHAROUN’S STUDIO

Hans Scharoun never saw his buildings as abstract concepts; he always intended them as places for people. The late architect was a proponent of “organic building”, leaving his mark on the Berlin cityscape with the likes of the 1963 Philharmonie which features an iconic tented golden roof and ship-like portholes. Maritime elements are common in the Bremen-born designer’s work, including at Scharoun’s own studio on Heilmannring in Charlottenburg-Nord. It was here, amongst the housing estates he helped design, that the architect lived and worked alongside his wife, fashion journalist Margit von Plato. Today, the studio, which was Scharoun’s workplace until his death in 1972, can be visited as part of a guided tour.

Though its furnishings are long gone, the studio offers a revealing insight into how the architect planned his buildings. Looking out of the huge eighth floor windows onto the surrounding flats and greenery of Volkspark Jungfernheide, you can imagine Scharoun at work on his designs. Normally, studio visits are only offered four times a year, but to mark the 50th anniversary of the architect’s death, tour guide Christian Fessel is offering group visits to the studio on an (almost) monthly basis (the next is Sunday 02.10). The two-hour tour through Charlottenburg-Nord includes a journey around the 1920s Siemensstadt housing estate, which was designed by Walter Gropius and Fred Forbát as well as Scharoun. Well worth a visit, the site has UNESCO World Heritage status.

Text: Laura Storfner / Photos: Christian Fessel

Guided tours of Charlottenburg North with a visit to Hans Scharoun’s studio can be booked online.
Sun 02.10.2022 11h & 14h15. The studio does not offer disabled access. 

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