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MODERNIST BERLIN AT THE BERLINISCHE GALERIE — THE WORLD AS SEEN BY FERDINAND HODLER

MODERNIST BERLIN AT THE BERLINISCHE GALERIE — THE WORLD AS SEEN BY FERDINAND HODLER

Draped fabrics, arranged bodies, striking faces – and again and again the color green. Ferdinand Hodler’s paintings hover somewhere between Gustav Klimt and Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, yet they have their own distinct mood. The Swiss painter’s time in Berlin at the end of the 19th century is the starting point for the exhibition Ferdinand Hodler and Modernist Berlin, which can be seen at the Berlinische Galerie until 17.01.2022. With 50 paintings from Berlin Secession artists including Lovis Corinth, Walter Leistikow, Hans Thoma, Julie Wolfthorn and Hodler himself, the show demonstrates the artist’s key role in Berlin Modernism. Hodler drew strength from nature and man’s role in it, something made clear in the way images of mountain ranges appear in picnic blankets upon which lightly-clad models lie.

Strong brushstrokes portray dancers and young men; form is at the forefront but not so much that it makes the subjects anonymous. No two faces in his paintings are alike, with each telling a different story. Hodler’s depictions of metaphorical worlds were not well received when they first appeared in Berlin: it took numerous annual exhibitions between 1898 and the First World War before he gained a wide audience. This latest show brings a touch of springtime as the first cold weather arrives. Just the thing, then, for a rainy autumn afternoon.

Text: Hanna Komornitzyk / Credit: Kunsthalle Mannheim, Rainer Diehl; SIK-ISEA, Zürich (Philipp Hitz) / Photo: Harry Schnitger

Berlinische Galerie, Alte Jakobstr.124–128, 10969 Berlin–Kreuzberg; map

Ferdinand Hodler and Modernist Berlin, until 17.01.2022
Wed–Mon 10–18h. You can book tickets online.

@berlinischegalerie

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ROHKUNSTBAU 26 — EXPLORING HUMANITY, NATURE AND CONSUMERISM AT SCHLOSS LIEBEROSE

ROHKUNSTBAU 26 — EXPLORING HUMANITY, NATURE AND CONSUMERISM AT SCHLOSS LIEBEROSE

If you are finding it hard to say goodbye to summer, why not delay the inevitable with a last weekend excursion? Your destination is Schloss Lieberose, one of Brandenburg’s largest baroque country houses set in a 25,000-hectare moorland reserve two hours’ drive from Berlin. But this picturesque setting isn’t even the main attraction; that honor goes to the Rohkunstbau, a group art exhibition that is now in its fourth year. Titled “Ich bin Natur. Von der Verletzlichkeit. Überleben in der Risikogesellschaft.” (“I am Nature. Of Vulnerability. Survival in a Risk-based Society”), the show considers how endless consumption is changing our relationship with nature. In the abandoned rooms and corridors of the palace, 20 international artists create tense, foreboding environments. A three-channel video installation by Nina Fischer and Maroan el Sani asks people in different parts of Japan how their lives changed after the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and resulting reactor explosion at Fukushima.

Set in a hypothetical, dystopian future, Nadia Lichtig has the conspicuously-named Ziziphus plant perform a monologue about its own history. Meanwhile, Yoko Ono has filled one of the two-storey halls with young trees upon which you can hang your wishes for the future. Rohkunstbau 26 works on a metaphorical plane: more playful than critical, the show works charmingly with the aged surroundings of the palace. You can visit both the house and the exhibition at weekends.

Text: Hanna Komornitzyk / Credit: Freunde des Rohkunstbau e.V.; Claudia Chaseling, VG Bildkunst Bonn, 2021; Luzia Simons, VG Bildkunst Bonn, 2021; Sammlung Archives Nationales Paris / Photos: Jan Brockhaus, Freunde des Rohkunstbau e.V.

Schloss Lieberose, Schloßhof 3, 15868 Lieberose; map

Rohkunstbau 26. “Ich bin Natur. Von der Verletzlichkeit. Überleben in der Risikogesellschaft”, until 03.10.2021
Sat & Sun 12–18h. Tickets can be booked online.

@rohkunstbau26

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BEBEL STAGE — EIGHT-DAY MUSIC FESTIVAL WITH BIG BAND JAZZ, POP TUNES AND TECHNO BEATS ON BEBELPLATZ

BEBEL STAGE — EIGHT-DAY MUSIC FESTIVAL WITH BIG BAND JAZZ, POP TUNES AND TECHNO BEATS ON BEBELPLATZ

For what will be one of the last outdoor festivals of the summer, Bebel Stage is going grand. Starting this Friday (24.09.2021), orchestras, pop groups and even a 40-person jazz band will take to the stage at one of Berlin’s most beautiful corners: Bebelplatz. The eight-day music festival is a celebration of Berlin artists, with a program that takes you from punky pop and acoustic to high-energy swing. Kicking things off is The Moka Efti Orchestra with a performance of their danceable and full-on jazz (24.09). The band featured in the hit TV series Babylon Berlin set in the Weimar era, and their performance will be accompanied by other artists dealing with the onset of dictatorship in that period. On 25.09, XJAZZ! Festival will be taking over the stage with the likes of Brandt Brauer Frick, a techno project blending electronic beats with classical musicianship. The musical mixing continues with pop duo ÄTNA, who will team up with the NDR Bigband on 29.09 for a round of jazz experimentation. Next, singer-songwriter Balbina will bring her atmospheric, percussive sounds to the program with a performance on 01.10. The festival is free of charge and has an onsite bar for food and drinks as well as dramatic views of the Staatsoper and PalaisPopulaire. But be sure to get there early: entry is limited to 1000 guests!

Text: Benji Haughton / Credit: visitBerlin; Josefine Schulz / Photos: visumate Löwe & Anja Jurleit

Bebelplatz, Unter den Linden, 10117 Berlin–Mitte; map

Bebel Stage (24.09–03.10.2021). Entry to the festival is free of charge. 3G rules apply; attendance is limited to 1000 people (first come, first serve).

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THE COLOR OF SILENCE: NOTHINGTOSEENESS AT THE AKADEMIE DER KÜNSTE

THE COLOR OF SILENCE: NOTHINGTOSEENESS AT THE AKADEMIE DER KÜNSTE

If you wanted to depict silence, what would it look like? The late composer and artist John Cage dealt with this very question with his concept of Nothingtoseeness. Fast-forward to now and the Akademie der Künste is making the term that Cage coined the starting point for its latest exhibition. Through paintings, photographs, sculptures and installations, more than 50 artists trace the path from fullness to emptiness. The show covers the concept’s whole development, from the color field paintings of the 1950s to newly-created works. Raimund Girke demonstrates the multifaceted nature of the “non-color” white in his paintings, a theme which Isaac Julien’s film “True North” – shot in the Arctic – also touches. Silence itself can also be experienced with Pierre Huyghe’s score “Silence”, which revisits Cage’s legendary musical work 4’33” in which not a single note is played. With this show the Akademie der Künste invites you to meditate on the idea of seeing itself, showing how nothingness can be many-sided if only you look a bit closer.

Text: Laura Storfner / Credit: AdK; Stephan Huber; Thomas Rentmeister; Rutherford Chang

Akademie der Künste, Hanseatenweg 10, 10557 Berlin–Tiergarten; map
Nothingtoseeness – Void/White/Silence, until 12.12.2021, Tue–Sun 11–19h

Tickets cost €9/6. Free entry for under 18s and for all on Tuesday from 15h and the first Sunday of the month.  Tours: Thur 17h & Sun 12h, €3 in addition to the ticket price.

@akademiederkuenste

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YES TO ALL! DISCOVER THE WILHELM HALLEN AT BERLIN ART WEEK

YES TO ALL! DISCOVER THE WILHELM HALLEN AT BERLIN ART WEEK

Berlin Art Week is in full swing. We offered you a little insight into some of the highlights last week and continue to share daily stories on Instagram. As part of our partnership with BAW we’re also serving up some culinary tips to accompany your gallery-packed week. But besides artworks and artists, the Art Week is also a time to discover new places and this year it’s the Wilhelm Hallen gallery and creative complex that is on the radar. Besides hosting Canadian lighting company Bocci and other creative firms, the former industrial site is home to a group exhibition called Yes to all. The show includes poppy and bold installations like Sylvie Fleurie’s inflatable sculptures plus works from French artist Johanna Dumet and rising star Hanna Sophie Dunkelberg. Worth seeing too is Berlin Masters’ award winner Young-jun Tak as well as the contributions from Berlin galleries PSM, ChertLüdde, Klemm’s, KOW and Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler. Is Reinickendorf the next up-and-coming spot on the city’s art map? A visit to this show suggests it might just be…

Text: Nina Trippel / Photos: Trevor Good & Philipp Solf

Yes to all at Wilhelm Hallen, Kopenhagener Str.60–72, 13407 Berlin–Reinickendorf, map
Until 19.09.2021, Thu & Fri 14–19h, Sat & Sun 12–19h

@wilhelmhallen

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