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FINE DEODORANT: A DEPENDABLE EVERYDAY COMPANION

FINE DEODORANT: A DEPENDABLE EVERYDAY COMPANION

At first, I was sceptical; now I’m a convert. Rarely have I been as convinced by a product as I am by Fine Deodorant. My initial hesitation stemmed from the fact that the small, individually designed jars and tubes don’t contain aluminium salts (though they do contain harmless aluminium silicates; read more on that here) and also have fewer of the other unpronounceable words usually found on ingredients lists. I’ve tested several types while undertaking a range of everyday activities and am happy to confirm that Fine keeps you body odor-free, thanks to ingredients like coconut oil. For use at home, I recommend the glass jar format, out of which you scoop out the paste with a tiny spatula, while the tube format is very practical for traveling. The neutral type is great for sensitive skin, or there’s a range of essential oil versions to suit your scent. I first came across this deodorant brand at Andreas Murkudis, but it’s also available through Fine Deodorant’s website, along with samples — so you can find your favorite. (Text: Nina Trippel / Photos: Emilie Wade)

Fine Deodorant: Website, Instagram, Facebook

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ANATOMIEFLEUR — AN AVANT GARDE APPROACH TO FLORAL ART

ANATOMIEFLEUR — AN AVANT GARDE APPROACH TO FLORAL ART

There are flowers that delight, and there are flowers that stop you in your tracks and prompt you to reconsider notions of romance. The latter variety is what Amandine Cheveau and Jean-Christian Pullin, the duo behind Anatomiefleur, deal in. From bespoke bouquets for private clients to high fashion editorials, the pair furthers a “poetic dialogue between flowers, art, and space”, transforming floral arrangements into sculptures infused with symbolism. It’s likely you’ve encountered Anatomiefleur’s work around town — Amandine and Jean-Christian work with Ernst, created Gallery Weekend installations at the likes of Boros Collection and König Gallery and have collaborated with performance artist Bendik Giske at KW, amongst many other projects. From their light-flooded, minimal showroom at Strausberger Platz’s historic Haus des Kindes, Anatomiefleur continues to go from strength to strength. Keep an eye out for more of their subversive floral romanticism, soon to be seen in Gruppe and Nuda Paper. And when you’re in the market for a next-level bouquet, you know who to call. (Text: Anna Dorothea Ker / Photos: Anatomiefleur, Alex de Brabant)

Anatomiefleur, Strausberger Platz 19, 10243 Berlin-Friedrichshain; map

By appointment only: contact@anatomiefleur.com

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CAKESBERLIN — BAKED-TO-ORDER TRUE WORKS OF ART

CAKESBERLIN — BAKED-TO-ORDER TRUE WORKS OF ART

There is an abundance of cake in Berlin, but we have yet to see any quite as beautiful as those made by Stephanie, owner of CakesBerlin. Born in Israel, Stephanie studied fine art and worked as a set designer before moving to Berlin. After receiving more and more requests from friends to bake for their birthdays, she decided, on a whim, to set up a Facebook page. Three years later and a fleeting idea is now a full-fledged company where she bakes cakes fresh to order from her kitchen in Kreuzberg for an impressive list of clients and individuals in the city. Although she has a natural gift for baking, her artistic eye is what makes these cakes so unique. Each one is a work of art that she creates with incredible patience, meticulously painting, placing and perfecting every last decorative detail. All her creations are based on a light, buttery sponge cake with a melt-in-your-mouth fresh cream filling. Customers can choose from a range of flavors, such as “Old School Vanilla” and “Vanilla with Salted Caramel and Chocolate Cream,” as well as customize the color scheme and design. Next time you need a bespoke cake for any occasion (make one up if necessary), you know whom to call. (Text: Lucy Thorpe)

Order online with at least a week’s notice via CakesBerlin or call Stephanie at 0157 802 69 563.

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BERLIN STORIES: THE CITY UNFILTERED IN FOUR VOLUMES

BERLIN STORIES: THE CITY UNFILTERED IN FOUR VOLUMES

Hatje Cantz‘s new photo book series “Berlin Stories” shows snapshots as raw as the city it pays tribute to. Yet it’s precisely in its raw edges where Berlin’s charm and unique beauty is to be found. In “Hundekopf” (vol.1) Ama Split and Riky Kiwy take us on a trip around the Ringbahn; the immediate surroundings of the stations revealing the everyday cityscape between buildings, courtyards and kiosks. The photographs in Ed Broner’s “Vagabondage Diary” (vol.2) dare to give us an intimate look through the keyhole at Berlin’s notorious nightlife and club culture, in an autobiographical collection of the former bouncer at the club “90 Grad.” The first volume was published in April 2018, and two more will follow this fall, also depicting works by artists whose careers have been shaped by the city. This series was made for lovers of Berlin at its unembellished finest. (Text: Jennifer Prietzel / Photos: Pamina Aichhorn)

Berlin Stories vol.1+2 (Hatje Cantz Verlag, 2018), available online.

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MINDFUL & SUSTAINABLE COOKING WITH TAINÁ GUEDES

MINDFUL & SUSTAINABLE COOKING WITH TAINÁ GUEDES

In case you haven’t heard: banana skins are edible. But I have to admit, that’s just a teaser to pique your interest in the recent cookbook by Tainá Guedes. At the moment it’s available only in German, under the long title “Die Küche der Achtsamkeit. Mottainai: Nichts verschwenden, kreativ kochen, gesund essen” (2017, Kunstmann Verlag). “Mottainai“, as you may know, is a term borrowed from Buddhism and loosely translates as ”don’t waste anything that has value”. That’s to say: this book is all about delicious food, but most of all about handling ingredients with love and care and using leftovers for new dishes. It’s not a dry lecture in food ethics, however — instead, it’s a practical, inspiring recipe book for everyday meals, as is encapsulated in the cover, which features a smiling Tainá Guedes. The author was born to a Japanese mother in Brazil and, luckily for us, she moved to Berlin to inspire this city with her cosmopolitan spirit and knowledge — founding the Entretempo Kitchen Gallery, amongst other projects. It’s precisely Tainá’s unique blend of Japanese-Brazilian-European influences that make her recipes special. Like that banana peel — it’s fried, by the way. And it’s only one of many delicacies shared in the book, next to “São Paulo-style couscous”, Japanese noodle dishes, napkin dumplings and much more. (Text: Nina Trippel / Photos: Pamina Aichhorn)

Tainá Guedes: “Die Küche der Achtsamkeit. Mottainai: Nichts verschwenden, kreativ kochen, gesund essen” (2017, Kunstmann Verlag)

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